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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Parasitism of Bemisia Tabaci on Numerous Species of Host Plants

Authors
item Abd-Rabou, Shaaban - GERMAIN FOUNDATION
item Simmons, Alvin

Submitted to: National Research and Action Plan for Silver Leaf Whitefly
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 25, 2002
Publication Date: April 10, 2002
Citation: ABD-RABOU, S., SIMMONS, A.M. PARASITISM OF BEMISIA TABACI ON NUMEROUS SPECIES OF HOST PLANTS. NATIONAL RESEARCH AND ACTION PLAN FOR SILVER LEAF WHITEFLY. 2002. Abstract p.182.

Technical Abstract: The influence of numerous vegetable and other agronomic plant species on incidence of parasitism of the B-biotype sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), by augmentation with parasitoids was determined in field plots. Tests were conducted on 16 taxonomically diversified plant species (Beta vulgaris L., Brassica oleracea var botrytis L., Brassica oleracea var capitata L., Citrullus lanatus (Thunberg) Matsum. & Nakai ssp. lanatus., Cucumis melo L., Cucumis sativus L., Glycine max (L.) Merrill, Gossypium barbadense L., Helianthus annus L., Ipomea batatas L., Lantana camara L., Lycopersicum esculentum Miller, Phaseolns vulgaris L., Solanum melongena L., Solanum tuberosum L., and Vigna sinensis L.). Parasitism in plots with feral infestations by B. tabaci was evaluated through augmentations with Eretmocerus mundus Mercet from a laboratory colony, and comparisons were made with check plots in which no parasitoid releases were made. Plots were set up at five locations in Egypt (Beihera, Beni-Suef, Kafr ElShikh, Minufiya, and Qalyubiya). Each plot (0.13 hectares) contained a single plant species. Adult E. mundus were released during each of 15 weeks in treatment plots, and parasitism data were collected weekly over 15 weeks. The release rate was 5-12 parasitoids per plant and the releases were done using vials of parasitoids that were attached to the plants. Parasitism was enhanced in all plots where augmentations were made. In some plots, e.g., both species of Brassica, B. vulgaris, and G. max, overall parasitism was enhanced at a relatively high rate while in other plots, e.g., C. lanatus, S. melongena, and L. esculentum, the enhancement of overall parasitism was relatively low. In both treated and untreated plots for all plant species, parasitism peaked 7-12 weeks after the first augmentation date. Results from this study describe the relative seasonal abundance and relative degree of augmentative enhancement of parasitism of Bemisia among numerous plant species of economic importance.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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