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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Efficatious Application Rates of Propargyl Bromide and Iodomethane/chloropicrin for Strawberry Production.

Authors
item Ajwa, Husein - UNIV OF CALIF DAVIS
item Schutter, Mary - COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY
item Nelson, Shad - TEXAS A & M UNIVERSITY
item Trout, Thomas
item Winterbottom, Christopher - CA STRAWBERRY COMMISSION

Submitted to: Methyl Bromide Alternatives and Emissions Research Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: November 1, 2001
Publication Date: November 16, 2001
Citation: Ajwa, H.A., Schutter, M., Nelson, S.D., Trout, T.J., Winterbottom, C. 2001. Efficatious application rates of propargyl bromide and iodomethane/chloropicrin for strawberry production.. Methyl Bromide Alternatives and Emissions Research Conference Proceedings.

Interpretive Summary: Earlier research showed that applications of alternative fumigants (such as chloropicrin and 1,3-dichloropropene) with irrigation water through drip irrigation systems might be a more effective method than shank injection in raised-bed culture. Drip fumigation would also be economical and environmentally friendly, reduce worker exposure, and would reduce the amount of chemicals applied. The objective of this study was to determine the most efficacious application rate and method of iodomethane:chloropicrin mixture and propargyl bromide for strawberry production in California. Three rates of IM:Pic (50:50) mixture and of PrBr were applied by drip fumigation or shank injection approximately four weeks before planting. Fruit yields were significantly greater in the chemical treatments than in the untreated plots. For most application rates, strawberry yields from drip fumigation were greater than yields from shank injection treatment. Our results indicate that a minimum of 300 lbs/ac of IM:Pic or 120 lbs/ac of PrBr is needed for strawberry production. Reduced yields in the PrBr treatments in the Salinas soil were attributed to phytotoxicity. Cool climate and soil type in Salinas may have delayed the dissipation/degradation of PrBr.

Technical Abstract: Earlier research showed that applications of alternative fumigants (such as chloropicrin and 1,3-dichloropropene) with irrigation water through drip irrigation systems might be a more effective method than shank injection in raised-bed culture. Drip fumigation would also be economical and environmentally friendly, reduce worker exposure, and would reduce the amount of chemicals applied. The objective of this study was to determine the most efficacious application rate and method of iodomethane:chloropicrin mixture and propargyl bromide for strawberry production in California. Three rates of IM:Pic (50:50) mixture and of PrBr were applied by drip fumigation or shank injection approximately four weeks before planting. Fruit yields were significantly greater in the chemical treatments than in the untreated plots. For most application rates, strawberry yields from drip fumigation were greater than yields from shank injection treatment. Our results indicate that a minimum of 300 lbs/ac of IM:Pic or 120 lbs/ac of PrBr is needed for strawberry production. Reduced yields in the PrBr treatments in the Salinas soil were attributed to phytotoxicity. Cool climate and soil type in Salinas may have delayed the dissipation/degradation of PrBr.

Last Modified: 12/28/2014
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