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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: PRECISION FARMING TECHNIQUES FOR WEED MANAGEMENT

Authors
item Hanks, James
item Hanks, James
item Thomson, Steven
item Thomson, Steven

Submitted to: Proceedings of Southern Weed Science Society
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 26, 2002
Publication Date: January 26, 2002
Citation: Hanks, J.E., Thomson, S.J. 2002. Precision farming techniques for weed management. Proceedings of Southern Weed Science Society. 53:209.

Interpretive Summary: Abstract, none required.

Technical Abstract: Preliminary studies were conducted to investigate methods of geo- referencing weed locations in fields for site-specific application of herbicides. Ground-based and aerial methods were examined. Ground-based methods included scouting fields with a backpack GPS and marking areas where weeds were present and remote sensing from a high-clearance sprayer using a video monitoring system (VMS-200 Red Hen Systems) that interfaced digital video camera (Sony TRV-103) and GPS. Aerial remote sensing was from an agricultural spray plane with the same video monitoring system. Scouting fields with a GPS was the most accurate method and provided weed identification as the scouting was being conducted. Driving through the field provided accurate location of weeds and often weed identification could be made without scouting the field. Driving the perimeter of field provided a visual record of where weeds were, allowing prescription maps to obe written approximating weedy locations. Location and identification of weedy areas from aerial images varied with height of the plane and field condition. Images obtained from heights of 120m and 460m over bare soil or where the crop canopy was small were adequate to identify concentrated patches of weeds, but not individual scattered weeds. At heights less than approximately 15m, images of individual weeds could be captured. Each of the methods investigated has potential of identifying weeds in crops and providing maps for site-specific application of herbicides, but procedures will require significant refinement.

Submitted to: Proceedings of Southern Weed Science Society
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 26, 2002
Publication Date: January 26, 2002
Citation: Hanks, J.E., Thomson, S.J. 2002. Precision farming techniques for weed management. Proceedings of Southern Weed Science Society. 53:209.

Interpretive Summary: Abstract, none required.

Technical Abstract: Preliminary studies were conducted to investigate methods of geo- referencing weed locations in fields for site-specific application of herbicides. Ground-based and aerial methods were examined. Ground-based methods included scouting fields with a backpack GPS and marking areas where weeds were present and remote sensing from a high-clearance sprayer using a video monitoring system (VMS-200 Red Hen Systems) that interfaced digital video camera (Sony TRV-103) and GPS. Aerial remote sensing was from an agricultural spray plane with the same video monitoring system. Scouting fields with a GPS was the most accurate method and provided weed identification as the scouting was being conducted. Driving through the field provided accurate location of weeds and often weed identification could be made without scouting the field. Driving the perimeter of field provided a visual record of where weeds were, allowing prescription maps to obe written approximating weedy locations. Location and identification of weedy areas from aerial images varied with height of the plane and field condition. Images obtained from heights of 120m and 460m over bare soil or where the crop canopy was small were adequate to identify concentrated patches of weeds, but not individual scattered weeds. At heights less than approximately 15m, images of individual weeds could be captured. Each of the methods investigated has potential of identifying weeds in crops and providing maps for site-specific application of herbicides, but procedures will require significant refinement.

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
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