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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Interaction Between Beet Necrotic Yellow Vein Virus and Beet Soil-Borne Mosaic Virus in Sugar Beet

Authors
item Wisler, Gail - UNIV. FLORIDA,GAINESVILLE
item Lewellen, Robert
item Sears, John
item Wasson, Jeffery
item Liu, Hsing Yeh
item Wintermantel, William

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2003
Publication Date: November 20, 2003
Citation: Wisler, G.C., Lewellen, R.T., Sears, J.L., Wasson, J.W., Liu, H., Wintermantel, W.M. Interaction between beet necrotic yellow vein virus and beet soil-borne mosaic virus in sugar beet. Plant Disease. 2003. v. 87. p. 1170-1175.

Interpretive Summary: Beet Necrotic Yellow Vein Virus (BNYVV) is a highly destructive soil-borne virus of sugar beet and is transmitted by the plasmodiophorid-like fungus, Polymyxa betae. It is found in most sugar beet growing regions worldwide. Beet Soil-Borne Mosaic Virus (BSBMV) also infects sugar beet but less is known about its effect on beet production. BSBMV is found in beet productions areas throughout the Midwestern United States. Both viruses belong to the Genus Benyvirus in the Family Furoviridae. BNYVV and BSBMV are often found as mixed infections. Resistant beet cultivars are available for BNYVV. The objectives of this study were: (i) to determine if the resistance gene for BNYVV also confers resistance to BSBMV, and (ii) to determine the effects of P. betae, BNYVV, and BSBMV, alone and in combination, on the growth and relative virus concentration in sugar beet. The resistance gene to BNYVV did not confer resistance to BSBMV. P. betae alone had a significant negative effect on growth of sugar beet in greenhouse pot cultures. The concentration of BSBMV was significantly higher in single infections than in mixed infections with BNYVV, in both the rhizomania-resistant and susceptible varieties. In contrast, concentrations of BNYVV were high in both the single and mixed infections in the rhizomania-susceptible variety, but were low in the rhizomania- resistant variety. Therefore, in the absence of BNYVV, concentrations of BSBMV are high, regardless of the resistance genotype. However, in the presence of BNYVV, concentrations of BSBMV are low in both varieties, similar to those of plants grown in non-infested soils. Soils infested with P. betae, and with one or both viruses, tended to have reduced seedling emergence and reduced fresh weight.

Technical Abstract: Soils naturally infested with cultures of avirulent Polymyxa betae and P. betae that were infected with the two sugar beet benyviruses BNYVV and BSBMV, alone and in combination, were compared to non-infested soil for their effects on seedling emergence, fresh plant weight, and virus content. Two sugar beet varieties were used: a diploid (Rzrz) that carries resistance to rhizomania caused by BNYVV, and a triploid rhizomania- susceptible variety (rzrzrz). The Rz resistance gene to BNYVV did not confer resistance to BSBMV. P. betae alone had a significant negative effect on growth of sugar beet in greenhouse pot cultures. Titers of BSBMV were significantly higher in single infections than in mixed infections with BNYVV, in both the rhizomania-resistant and susceptible varieties. In contrast, titers of BNYVV were high (8 to 14 times the healthy mean) in single and in mixed infections in the rhizomania-susceptible variety, but were low (ca. three times the healthy mean) in the rhizomania-resistant variety. Therefore, in the absence of BNYVV, titers of BSBMV are high, regardless of the resistance genotype. However, in the presence of BNYVV, titers of BSBMV are low in both varieties, with absorbance (A405nm) readings similar to those of plants grown in non-infested soils. BNYVV may either out-compete or suppress BSBMV in mixed infections, even in rhizomania-resistant varieties in which titers of BNYVV are extremely low. Soils infested with P. betae, and with one or both viruses, tended to have reduced seedling emergence and reduced fresh weight, despite the use of protective fungicides.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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