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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: USDA ARS Research Programs on Microbes for Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes

Authors
item Meyer, Susan
item Meyer, Susan

Submitted to: Pest Management Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 20, 2003
Publication Date: July 1, 2003
Citation: Meyer, S.L. 2003. USDA ARS Research Programs on Microbes for Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes. Pest Management Science 59: 665-670.

Interpretive Summary: Plant-parasitic nematodes are microscopic worms that attack plants, causing ten billion dollars in annual crop losses in the U.S. Restrictions on use of chemical nematicides have increased the need for new methods of managing these nematodes. Consequently, the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) is addressing the problem of finding new ways to reduce nematode-induced crop losses. Nematode-antagonistic microbes, and active compounds produced by such microbes, are being explored as potential additions to management practices. Programs in this area at ARS investigate applied biocontrol agents, naturally occurring beneficial soil microbes, and compounds produced by microbes. Specific research topics include use of plant growth-promoting bacteria and cultural practices for management of root-knot and ring nematodes, determination of management strategies that enhance activity of bacteria that are already in the soil, studies on interactions between biocontrol bacteria and bacterial-feeding nematodes, and screening of microbes for compounds active against plant-parasitic nematodes. Additionally, some studies involve biocontrol agents that are active against soilborne plant- pathogenic fungi, or combinations of beneficial bacteria and fungi, to manage a spectrum of plant diseases or be combined to increase activity over a broader range of environmental conditions. These results are significant because they will ultimately have impact by providing additions to existing management systems for plant-parasitic nematodes. The research will be used by scientists developing environmentally safe methods for managing diseases caused by nematodes.

Technical Abstract: Restrictions on use of conventional nematicides have increased the need for new methods of managing plant-parasitic nematodes. Consequently, nematode-antagonistic microbes, and active compounds produced by such organisms, are being explored as potential additions to management practices. Programs in this area at the USDA Agricultural Research Service investigate applied biocontrol agents, naturally occurring beneficial soil microbes, and biobased compounds. Specific research topics include use of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and cultural practices for management of root-knot and ring nematodes, determination of management strategies that enhance activity of naturally occurring Pasteuria (bacterial obligate parasites of nematodes), studies on interactions between biocontrol bacteria and bacterial-feeding nematodes, and screening of microbes for compounds active against plant-parasitic nematodes. Additionally, some studies involve biocontrol agents that are active against soilborne plant-pathogenic fungi, or combinations of beneficial bacteria and fungi, to manage a spectrum of plant diseases or be combined to increase efficacy over a broader range of environmental conditions. Effective methods or agents identified in the research programs are investigated as additions to existing management systems for plant-parasitic nematodes.

Submitted to: Pest Management Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 20, 2003
Publication Date: July 1, 2003
Citation: Meyer, S.L. 2003. USDA ARS Research Programs on Microbes for Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes. Pest Management Science 59: 665-670.

Interpretive Summary: Plant-parasitic nematodes are microscopic worms that attack plants, causing ten billion dollars in annual crop losses in the U.S. Restrictions on use of chemical nematicides have increased the need for new methods of managing these nematodes. Consequently, the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) is addressing the problem of finding new ways to reduce nematode-induced crop losses. Nematode-antagonistic microbes, and active compounds produced by such microbes, are being explored as potential additions to management practices. Programs in this area at ARS investigate applied biocontrol agents, naturally occurring beneficial soil microbes, and compounds produced by microbes. Specific research topics include use of plant growth-promoting bacteria and cultural practices for management of root-knot and ring nematodes, determination of management strategies that enhance activity of bacteria that are already in the soil, studies on interactions between biocontrol bacteria and bacterial-feeding nematodes, and screening of microbes for compounds active against plant-parasitic nematodes. Additionally, some studies involve biocontrol agents that are active against soilborne plant- pathogenic fungi, or combinations of beneficial bacteria and fungi, to manage a spectrum of plant diseases or be combined to increase activity over a broader range of environmental conditions. These results are significant because they will ultimately have impact by providing additions to existing management systems for plant-parasitic nematodes. The research will be used by scientists developing environmentally safe methods for managing diseases caused by nematodes.

Technical Abstract: Restrictions on use of conventional nematicides have increased the need for new methods of managing plant-parasitic nematodes. Consequently, nematode-antagonistic microbes, and active compounds produced by such organisms, are being explored as potential additions to management practices. Programs in this area at the USDA Agricultural Research Service investigate applied biocontrol agents, naturally occurring beneficial soil microbes, and biobased compounds. Specific research topics include use of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and cultural practices for management of root-knot and ring nematodes, determination of management strategies that enhance activity of naturally occurring Pasteuria (bacterial obligate parasites of nematodes), studies on interactions between biocontrol bacteria and bacterial-feeding nematodes, and screening of microbes for compounds active against plant-parasitic nematodes. Additionally, some studies involve biocontrol agents that are active against soilborne plant-pathogenic fungi, or combinations of beneficial bacteria and fungi, to manage a spectrum of plant diseases or be combined to increase efficacy over a broader range of environmental conditions. Effective methods or agents identified in the research programs are investigated as additions to existing management systems for plant-parasitic nematodes.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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