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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Movement of Whitefly Crawlers on Several Types of Vegetable Plants

Author
item Simmons, Alvin

Submitted to: Silverleaf Whitefly Research, Action and Technology Transfer Plan
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 25, 2002
Publication Date: March 22, 2002
Citation: SIMMONS, A.M. MOVEMENT OF WHITEFLY CRAWLERS ON SEVERAL TYPES OF VEGETABLE PLANTS. SILVERLEAF WHITEFLY RESEARCH, ACTION AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PLAN. 2002. Abstract p.193.

Technical Abstract: The nymphal stage of whitefly pests is important in terms of its relationship to plant damage, plant disorders, and pest management measures. It is well known that the B-biotype sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), feeds on and damages numerous species of vegetable crops. The crawler, i.e., active first instar, is the only mobile form of the immature whitefly. A study was conducted to determine any influence of vegetable plant species and temperature on net distance moved (between the egg site and final resting site) by crawlers of the B-biotype B. tabaci. Tests were conducted in the greenhouse as well as under controlled laboratory conditions on five vegetable hosts: cantaloupe, Cucumis melo L.; collard, Brassica oleracea ssp. acephala de Condolle; cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walpers ssp. unguiculata; pepper, Capsicum annuum L. ssp. annuum; and tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Miller. On the different host species, the average net distance that crawlers moved ranged from 2-15 mm with the shortest distance on collard. Individuals on pepper and cowpea ceased traveling 50 and 62 mm, respectively, from the site of hatching. Observations on collard in the laboratory indicate that the crawlers traveled an average of 21 minutes before developing to the 2nd instar. No effect of constant temperature (16-34oC) was detected on the net travel distance of the crawler. The data suggest that among the plant species in this study, collard is highly attractive for feeding and/or it offers suitable feeding sites that are easy to locate by the crawler. The results of this study help define the behavior of crawlers on several host plants and helps in ongoing research on host plant resistance.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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