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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of Overland and Lateral Subsurface Flow on Soil Water Variability at the Field Scale: Model Development

Authors
item Ruan, H - COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY
item Green, Timothy
item Ascough, James
item Ahuja, Lajpat

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 2, 1999
Publication Date: October 31, 1999
Citation: Ruan, H., Green, T.R., Ascough Ii, J.C., Ahuja, L.R. 1999. Effects of overland and lateral subsurface flow on soil water variability at the field scale: model development. Agronomy Abstracts, American Society of Agronomy Meetings, October 1999.

Interpretive Summary: Variability in soil water is a critical factor in determining the associated variability in agricultural production and chemical transport. Soil water variability in space and time can be affected by overland and lateral subsurface flow. It is important to consider the potentially com- plex interactions and multidimensional redistribution of soil water. We modified a finite element model to simulate the joint overland and sub- surface lateral flow that was affected by the landscape topography. The subsurface flow was assumed to be in a vertical two-dimensional plane and the overland flow was assumed to be one-dimensional along a hillslope transect. The simulated results with homogeneous soil showed spatial and temporal effects of overland flow and the subsurface lateral flow on soil water contents.

Technical Abstract: Variability in soil water is a critical factor in determining the associated variability in agricultural production and chemical transport. Soil water variability in space and time can be affected by overland and lateral subsurface flow. It is important to consider the potentially complex interactions and multidimensional redistribution of soil water. We modified a finite element model to simulate the joint overland and subsurface lateral flow that was affected by the landscape topography. The subsurface flow was assumed to be in a vertical two-dimensional plane and the overland flow was assumed to be one-dimensional along a hillslope transect. The simulated results with homogeneous soil showed spatial and temporal effects of overland flow and the subsurface lateral flow on soil water contents.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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