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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Response of Bell Pepper Near-Isogenic for the N Gene to Meloidogyne Incognita in Field Trials

Authors
item Thies, Judy
item Fery, Richard
item Mueller, John - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
item Miller, Stewart - CLEMSON UNIVERISTY
item Varne, Joseph - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 15, 2002
Publication Date: December 1, 2003
Citation: Thies, J.A., Fery, R.L., Mueller, J.D., Miller, S., Varne, J. 2003. Response of bell pepper near-isogenic for the N gene to Meloidogyne incognita in field trials. Hortscience. 38(7):1394-1396.

Interpretive Summary: The U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, USDA, ARS, Charleston, S.C., developed 'Charleston Belle' and 'Carolina Wonder', the first two root-knot nematode resistant bell peppers available in the U.S. Resistance of these two open- pollinated bell pepper cultivars to root-knot nematodes is controlled by the N (nematode) gene. In field studies at two sites in South Carolina, 'Charleston Belle' and 'Carolina Wonder' exhibited a high level of resistance to root-knot nematodes. However,'Keystone Resistant Giant' and 'Yolo Wonder' (the susceptible parental cultivars of 'Charleston Belle' and 'Carolina Wonder', respectively) do not carry the N gene, and thus were very susceptible to nematodes at both sites. At one site, 'Charleston Belle' produced significantly more marketable fruit than the other cultivars. These results demonstrate that resistance to root-knot nematode (controlled by the N gene) is effective in field planted bell pepper. Resistant bell peppers should provide economical and environmentally compatible alternatives to soil fumigation with methyl bromide and other nematicides for managing nematodes. Resistant bell cultivars may also be useful as rotation crops for managing nematodes in subsequent susceptible vegetable crops.

Technical Abstract: Resistance of two sets of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) cultivars near- isogenic for the N gene that conditions resistance to root-knot nematodes were compared in field tests at Blackville, S.C. and Charleston, S.C. The isogenic bell pepper sets were 'Charleston Belle' (NN) and 'Keystone Resistant Giant' (nn), and 'Carolina Wonder' (NN) and 'Yolo Wonder' (nn). The resistant cultivars 'Charleston Belle' and 'Carolina Wonder' were highly resistant. The susceptible parental cultivars, 'Keystone Resistant Giant' and 'Yolo Wonder' were susceptible. 'Charleston Belle' had 87.7% fewer eggs per g fresh root than 'Keystone Resistant Giant' and 'Carolina Wonder' had 98.3% fewer eggs per g fresh root than 'Yolo Wonder'. At Blackville, 'Charleston Belle' had greater marketable fruit yield (P less than 0.06) than the other cultivars. 'Charleston Belle' and 'Carolina Wonder' exhibited a high level of resistance at both sites. These results demonstrate that resistance conferred by the N gene is effective in field planted bell pepper. Root-knot resistant bell peppers should provide economical and environmentally compatible alternatives to methyl bromide and other nematicides for managing M. incognita.

Last Modified: 7/14/2014