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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Breeding for Resistance to Columbia Root Knot Nematode and Corky Ringspot Disease

Authors
item Brown, Charles
item Mojtahedi, H - WSU-IAREC, PROSSER, WA
item Santo, G - WSU-IAREC, PROSSER, WA

Submitted to: Potato Progress
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: January 3, 2002
Publication Date: January 25, 2002
Citation: BROWN, C.R., MOJTAHEDI, H., SANTO, G.S. BREEDING FOR RESISTANCE TO COLUMBIA ROOT KNOT NEMATODE AND CORKY RINGSPOT DISEASE. POTATO PROGRESS. 2(1):3. 2002.

Technical Abstract: Columbia Root-knot nematode penetrates tubers and causes brown spots in the flesh and ugly bumps in the skin. The tobacco rattle virus is transmitted to potato tubers by stubby root nematodes and results in the black sectors known as corky ringspot disease. Soil fumigation is the most common treatment for these problems. The combined fumigation may cost up to $350 per acre. We incorporated the resistance to root-knot from a wild Mexican potato into advanced breeding lines. Resistance to corky ringspot was found in advanced breeding clones derived from crosses with old European potato varieties. Resistance to corky ringspot is not unusual in European varieties. Until now resistance to root-knot was non-existent in potato varieties. We were able to identify promising materials with resistance to corky ringspot tested at growers' fields in Washington and Oregon. We found that the late blight resistant clone A90586-11 and the excellent dual purpose clone A9014-2 appear to have significant resistance to corky ringspot disease. In a root-knot infested field we were able to select resistance and some of these clones are also corky ringspot resistant. Resistant cultivars will substantially reduce the cost of production by reducing the cost of fumigation in many potato production areas. Resistant varieties will also reduce environmental contamination.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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