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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Four New Penicillium Species Having Darkly Melanized Conidiophores

Authors
item Peterson, Stephen
item Sigler, Lynne - UNIV. OF ALBERTA, CANADA

Submitted to: Mycological Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 15, 2002
Publication Date: September 1, 2002
Citation: PETERSON, S.W., SIGLER, L. FOUR NEW PENICILLIUM SPECIES HAVING DARKLY MELANIZED CONIDIOPHORES. MYCOLOGICAL RESEARCH. 2002. V. 106 (9). P. 1109-1118.

Interpretive Summary: For many years, molds were placed into different genera based on the overall color of the mold when grown on agar. This presents a conundrum when the microscopic appearance of two molds is very similar but they have different colors. We applied molecular tests (DNA sequence comparisons) to determine whether the genetic similarity of molds is best reflected in the color of the molds or by the microscopic appearance. The results reveal that color is only secondarily important when compared to the microscopic appearance and molecular comparisons. Based on the outcome of the molecular studies we discovered and named four new mold species in the genus Penicillium that have different colors than have ever been accepted in that group before. These molds appear to play a role in the decomposition of surface layer organic matter especially in subarctic habitats.

Technical Abstract: Five fungal isolates tentatively identified in the genus Thysanophora, were re-examined from multi-locus DNA sequence analysis to confirm their generic placement. The Thysanophora-like species belong in the genus Penicillium on the basis of phylogenetic analysis of their gene sequences. These phenotypically distinct isolates are phylogenetically unique and have described them as the new species Penicillium boreae, Penicillium subarcticum and Penicillium canariense. In addition, a description is provided for the new species, Penicillium pullum. The type specimen of this latter species is derived from NRRL 721, which served as the typical isolate of Penicillium fuscum in the monographic study of Raper and Thom and that of Ramirez. However, the name P. fuscum has been applied and neotypified using a different specimen, and NRRL 721 differs phylogenetically from the neotype of P. fuscum, therefore requiring the description of a new species.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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