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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Experiemntal Airborne Transmission of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus and Bordetella Bronchiseptica

Authors
item Brockmeier, Susan
item Lager, Kelly

Submitted to: Veterinary Microbiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 26, 2002
Publication Date: November 20, 2002
Citation: BROCKMEIER, S.L. LAGER, K.M. EXPERIEMNTAL AIRBORNE TRANSMISSION OF PORCINE REPRODUCTIVE AND RESPIRATORY SYNDROME VIRUS AND BORDETELLA BRONCHISEPTICA. VETERINARY MICROBIOLOGY. 2002. v. 89. p. 267-275.

Interpretive Summary: Field reports have suggested that transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) can occur by indirect means. The objectives of this study were to determine if airborne transmission of PRRSV or B. bronchiseptica can occur. Pigs infected with PRRSV, B. bronchiseptica, or both, were placed into one isolation tent, and uninfected pigs were placed into another isolation tent which received its air supply from the first isolation tent. Airborne transmission of both B. bronchiseptica and PRRSV to the uninfected pigs occurred. These experiments confirmed the fact that airborne transmission of PRRSV and B. bronchiseptica can occur over short distances. Thus, transmission of PRRSV and B. bronchiseptica between pigs in the same building probably occurs readily even without direct contact, and airborne spread over longer distances may be possible.

Technical Abstract: Experiments were designed to determine if porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) or Bordetella bronchiseptica could be transmitted through indirect airborne contact. Three principal pigs were infected with PRRSV, B. bronchiseptica, or both. Five days after the principal pigs were challenged, the three principal pigs and one direct- contact pig were placed into one isolation tent together, and three indirect-contact pigs were placed into another isolation tent which received its air supply from the first isolation tent. Airborne transmission of B. bronchiseptica occurred in 5/5 trials where B. bronchiseptica was the only agent used, and in 3/5 trials where the principal pigs were co-infected with both agents. Airborne transmission of PRRSV occurred in 4/5 trials where PRRSV was the only agent used, and in 2/5 trials where the principal pigs were co-infected with both agents. Thus, airborne transmission of both agents over short distances, such as within a barn, is probable.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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