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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Characterization of Beta-Hemolytic Group B Streptococcus Agalactiae in Cultured Seabream, Sparus Auratus L., and Wild Mullet, Liza Klunzingeri (Day), in Kuwait

Authors
item Evans, Joyce
item Klesius, Phillip
item Glibert, P - UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
item Shoemaker, Craig
item Al Sarawi, M - KUWAIT EPA
item Landsberg, J - FLA MARINE RES INSTITUTE
item Renandez, R - KUWAIT INS SCIENTIFIC RES

Submitted to: Journal of Fish Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 11, 2002
Publication Date: September 1, 2002
Citation: EVANS, J.J., KLESIUS, P.H., GLIBERT, P.M., SHOEMAKER, C.A., AL SARAWI, M.A., LANDSBERG, J., RENANDEZ, R.D. CHARACTERIZATION OF BETA-HEMOLYTIC GROUP B STREPTOCOCCUS AGALACTIAE IN CULTURED SEABREAM, SPARUS AURATUS L., AND WILD MULLET, LIZA KLUNZINGERI (DAY), IN KUWAIT. JOURNAL OF FISH DISEASES. 2002. 25, 505-513.

Interpretive Summary: In August and September 2001,Kuwait Bay experienced a massive fish kill which resulted in the death of nearly 3000 tons of mullet and subsequent public and economic concerns. Bacteriological specimens collected from sea bream in aquaculture facilities and dying wild mullet were analyzed for bacteria. Streptococcus agalactiae was isolated from 79.5% of all fish sampled. Experimental infectivity trials with mullet and sea bream brain isolates in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, caused 100 and 90% mortality within 7 days post inoculation indicating virulent S. agalactiae as the bacterial pathogen responsible for the epizootic in Kuwait Bay. In summary, the multifaceted microbiological investigation and pathogenicity trials determined that S. agalactiae was the etiological agent responsible for mullet and sea bream mortalities in Kuwait. This bacteria has caused massive mortalities in both farm raised fish and wild fish in the United States and Israel.

Technical Abstract: Streptococcus agalactiae was isolated from cultured gilthead seabream, Sparus auratus, (L.) and diseased wild large scale mullet, Liza macrolepis (Smith), in Kuwait Bay. Isolates were catalase negative, beta-hemolytic, Gram positive cocci, and serogroup B. Experimental infectivity trials with mullet and seabream brain isolates in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus L., caused 100 and 90% mortality within 7 days post inoculation indicating virulent S. agalactiae as the bacterial pathogen responsible for the epizootic in Kuwait Bay.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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