Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Localization of a Locus Determining Salmonellosis Resistance to Chicken Chromosome

Authors
item Mariani, Paola - UNIV OF MINNESOTA
item Barrow, P A - INSTIT FOR ANIM HEALTH UK
item Cheng, Hans
item Groenen, Martien - WAGENINGEN - NETHERLANDS
item Negrini, Riccardo - UNIV CATTOLICA - ITALY
item Bumstead, Nat - INSTIT FOR ANIM HEALTH UK

Submitted to: Immunogenetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 4, 2001
Publication Date: November 17, 2001
Citation: MARIANI, P., BARROW, P., CHENG, H.H., GROENEN, M.A., NEGRINI, R., BUMSTEAD, N. LOCALIZATION OF A LOCUS DETERMINING SALMONELLOSIS RESISTANCE TO CHICKEN CHROMOSOME. IMMUNOGENETICS. 2001. V. 53. P. 786-791.

Interpretive Summary: The field of genomics has great potential for all species, in addition to humans. Particularly relevant to the poultry industry, genomic research may enable the breeding of chicken lines with superior meat yield, egg production, or disease resistance. Prior to this occurring, the important genes need to be identified and located. In this paper, we describe the identification of a chromosomal region that contains a gene that confers resistance to salmonellosis, a major health problem to both chickens and humans. This knowledge enables the poultry breeding industry to develop a genetic test, which may lead to genetic resistance to salmonellosis. Ultimately, consumers would benefit from more economical and safe poultry food products.

Technical Abstract: Clear genetic differences in the susceptibility of chickens to the visceral infection by Salmonella have been observed and it has been possible to identify resistant and susceptible lines of inbred chickens. We report here the results of experiments to map directly the gene(s) controlling this trait in chickens by examining crosses between highly susceptible and highly resistant lines. In the mapping panel a region on chicken chromosome 5 was found to have a large effect on resistance, and this effect was observed in three separate resource populations. Mapping of additional marker loci in the region of the resistance gene further localized it to a region of approximately 2 cM, close to creatine kinase (CKB) and dynein (DNCL). This region shows conserved synteny with telomeric regions of human chromosome 14 and mouse chromosome 12. On the basis of this conserved synteny it seems unlikely that this resistance gene corresponds to the previously identified salmonellosis resistance genes Lps (located on mouse chromosome 4) or Nos2 (located on mouse chromosome 11). There was no association between Nramp1 and resistance in these crosses, although this gene was shown to contribute to resistance in other crosses. The homologous human and murine regions at present contain no likely candidate genes for this trait. Thus this appears to be a novel resistance gene, which we designate SAL1.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page