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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Plant Bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae) As Pests of Forage Legumes and Rangeland Grasses

Authors
item Henry, Thomas
item Wheeler, A - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY, SC

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: January 6, 2002
Publication Date: March 1, 2007
Citation: Henry, T. J., and A. G. Wheeler, Jr. 2006. Plant bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae). In W. O. Lamp et al. (eds.), Handbook of Forage and Rangeland Insects. Entomological Society of America, Landham, Maryland. pp. 83-91.

Interpretive Summary: Forage legumes and rangeland grasses are of major importance to livestock production in the United States. As a result, the insects that attack such crops are of great concern to American growers. This chapter treats the most important plant bugs, or Miridae, on these crops. No fewer than 135 species of plant bugs have the potential to develop on grasses and forage crops, but only a few of these bugs regularly cause economic damage This paper highlights the nine species we consider most important on forage legumes and rangeland grasses. Seven other species that have the potential to become pests are treated in a table. For each species we provide information on classification and distribution, a description of the adult, and a review of their pest status, resulting injury, life history, and management practices. This information will be of great interest to growers, livestock producers, and entomological researchers working on the control of insects on forage legumes and rangeland grasses.

Technical Abstract: This paper treats the most important plant bugs, or Miridae, found on forage legumes and rangeland grasses in North America. It is estimated that no fewer than 135 species of plant bugs have the potential to develop on grasses and forage crops. Nine species considered most important on forage legumes and rangeland grasses are highlighted. Provided for each of fthese species are information on classification and distribution, a description of the adult, and a review of their pest status, resulting injury, life history, and management practices. Seven other species that have the potential to become pests are treated in a table that includes a brief diagnosis and summary information on classification, origin, distribution, host plants, and injury.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014
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