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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Caprine Herpesvirus-2 Associated Malignant Catarrhal Fever in White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus Virginianus)

Authors
item Li, Hong
item Wunschmann, A - UNIV OF MINNESOTA
item Keller, Janice
item Hall, D - TEXAS A&M UNIV
item Crawford, T - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 30, 2002
Publication Date: January 20, 2003
Citation: Li, H., Wunschmann, A., Keller, J., Hall, D.G., Crawford, T.B. Caprine herpesvirus-2 associated malignant catarrhal fever in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation. 2003. v. 15. p. 46-49.

Interpretive Summary: In our last report, we found that goats carry a previously unrecognized member of the malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) group viruses that is related to, but distinct from other identified MCF viruses. In this study, we demonstrated that this virus, tentatively named caprine herpesvirus 2 (CpHV-2), was associated with MCF in white-tailed deer. Using PCR and sequencing techniques, we identified CpHV-2 viral sequence in two white-tailed deer with suspect MCF from Minnesota and Texas, respectively. We also detected the same sequences in goats that were housed with these deer in both farms. The study provides further confirmation that CpHV-2 is a pathogen, at least for deer, and emphasizes the risk of MCF loss when mixing deer with goats.

Technical Abstract: Presumable diagnosis of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) based on histopathlogy in two cases of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) were made in private captive deer farms in Minnesota and Texas. Antibody against an epitope conserved among the MCF group viruses was detected in the sera of both deer. DNA samples from the deer were subjected to various PCR amplifications. Alignment of the PCR amplified sequences revealed that the viral sequences from the diseased animals were 100% identical to each other, and to the newly recognized member of the MCF virus group endemic in domestic goats (Capra hircus), provisionally named caprine herpesvirus 2 (CpHV-2). A seroprevalence survey from one of the deer farms showed significant subclincal infection in the deer population. The study provides further confirmation that CpHV-2 is a pathogen, at least for deer, and emphasizes the risk of MCF loss when mixing cervids with goats.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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