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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Biosensor Strategies for Foodborne Pathogens

Authors
item Brandon, David
item Bates, Anne
item Mandrell, Robert
item Elliott, Christopher - DEPT AGRIC., BELFAST, UK

Submitted to: Association of Official Analytical Chemists International Symposium
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 16, 2001
Publication Date: September 9, 2001
Citation: Brandon, D.L., Bates, A.H., Mandrell, R.E., Elliott, C.E. 2001. Biosensor strategies for foodborne pathogens. Proceedings for 115th AOAC International Meeting, 9-13 Sept. 2001, Kansas City, MO. Abstract No. 1501.

Interpretive Summary: Campylobacter is thought to be responsible for over 2 million cases of gastroenteritis and several hundred deaths each year in the US. Campylobacters are widespread in the environment and are estimated to be present in 70% of fresh poultry products. We developed monoclonal antibodies for detecting Campylobacters and studying their interactions with food surfaces. Further studies utilizing these antibodies and others will help provide new methods for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens.

Technical Abstract: Campylobacter spp. are human pathogens thought to be responsible for over 2 million cases of gastroenteritis and several hundred deaths each year in the US. Campylobacters are widespread in the environment and are estimated to be present in 70% of fresh poultry products. To develop monoclonal antibody methods for detecting Campylobacters and studying their interactions with food surfaces, outer membrane complexes (OMC) from mixed strains of C. jejuni and C. coli were used to immunize mice. The mixed OMC was a very effective immunogen for eliciting two specificities of antibodies, those that recognize antigens specific to C. jejuni and those that recognize antigens common to both C. jejuni and C. coli, but not other Campylobacter spp. Monoclonal antibodies obtained included ones specific for the major outer membrane protein and antibodies which could detect phenotypic variation within colonies. Antibodies were able to detect Campylobacter on the surface of naturally contaminated samples of chicken. We will present data on the potential utility of these antibodies for detection of Campylobacters by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) as well as ELISA and SPR studies using strain-specific antibodies for E. coli. In addition to providing the means for regulatory monitoring, new analytical methods also serve as research tools which enable study of how pathogens enter the food processing stream, how they colonize foodstuffs and food handling equipment, and how changes in expression of surface components could result in increased retention during processing or enhanced pathogenicity.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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