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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluation of Pearl Millet Grain Hybrids for Resistance to Meloidogyne SPP.AND Leaf Blight Caused by Pyricularia Grisea.

Authors
item Timper, Patricia
item Wilson, Jeffrey
item Johnson, Alva
item Hanna, Wayne

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 22, 2002
Publication Date: August 1, 2002
Citation: Timper, P., Wilson, J.P., Johnson, A.W., Hanna, W.W. 2002. Evaluation of pearl millet grain hybrids for resistance to Meloidogyne spp. and leaf blight caused by Pyricularia grisea. Plant Disease. 86:909-914.

Interpretive Summary: Pearl millet has potential as a grain crop in the southeastern United States: it tolerates drought and low fertility conditions, thus requiring few irrigation and fertilizer inputs, and it is resistant to pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination. To be compatible in rotation with other crops grown in this region, pearl millet hybrids should not increase plant-parasitic nematodes. Root-knot nematodes (RKN) are major pests of cotton, peanut, and vegetable crops. Our objectives were to 1) determine the resistance of pearl millet hybrids to RKN, 2) compare reproduction of the nematodes on pearl millet and corn, and 3) determine the disease severity of leaf blight in experimental pearl millet hybrids. In a field naturally infested with RKN, experimental pearl millet hybrids with inbreds 114 and 117 as the pollinators had fewer numbers of nematodes and more severe leaf blight than did 'HGM-100', a nematode-susceptible hybrid; hybrids with inbred 115 as the pollinator were similar to 'HGM-100' in both nematode numbers and foliar disease severity. Grain yields in pearl millet declined with increasing densities of RKN, the stubby-root nematode, and leaf blight severity. In a greenhouse experiment, the southern and peanut RKN produced fewer eggs on pearl millet hybrids with pollinators 114, 117, 101, 102, and 103 than on hybrid 'HGM-100'. Reproduction of the southern RKN was less on the resistant pearl millet hybrids than on corn. Because both RKN and leaf blight can reduce grain yield of pearl millet, developed for the southeastern United States should be resistant to both pathogens.

Technical Abstract: Pearl millet, Pennisetum glaucum, has potential as a grain crop in the southeastern United States. Our objectives were to 1) determine the resistance and/or tolerance of pearl millet hybrids to M. incognita race 3 and M. arenaria race 1, 2) compare reproduction of Meloidogyne spp. on pearl millet and corn, and 3) determine the disease severity of leaf blight caused primarily by Pyricularia grisea. In a field naturally infested with M. incognita, experimental pearl millet hybrids with inbreds 114 and 117 as the pollinators had fewer numbers of second-stage juveniles and more severe leaf blight than did 'HGM-100', a nematode-susceptible hybrid; hybrids with inbred 115 as the pollinator were similar to 'HGM-100' in both nematode numbers and foliar disease severity. Grain yields in pearl millet were negatively correlated with densities of M. incognita, the stubby- root nematode Paratrichodorus sp., and leaf blight severity. In a greenhouse experiment, both M. incognita and M. arenaria produced fewer eggs on pearl millet hybrids with pollinators 114, 117, 101, 102, and 103 than on hybrid 'HGM-100'. Reproduction of M. incognita was less on the resistant pearl millet hybrids than on corn. Because both M. incognita and P. grisea can reduce grain yield of pearl millet, hybrids developed for the southeastern U.S. should be resistant to both pathogens.

Last Modified: 11/24/2014
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