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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Potato Nutrient Management Issues in the Pacific Northwest

Authors
item Alva, Ashok
item Collins, Harold
item Boydston, Rick

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2001
Publication Date: November 1, 2001
Citation: ALVA, A.K., COLLINS, H.P., BOYDSTON, R.A. POTATO NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT ISSUES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST. AGRONOMY ABSTRACTS (ON CD) 2001.

Technical Abstract: Potato production in the Pacific Northwest (Washington, Oregon, and Idaho) occupies over 250 thousand hectares, with an annual crop value of over 1.2 billion dollars. The Columbia Basin region of Washington and Oregon represents the high producing area (up to 80 Mg/ha) of high quality processed potatoes. This region represents sandy soils and relies on efficient management of irrigation and nutrients for profitable production and to minimize potential negative impacts on groundwater quality. Tuber N, the major component of N removal on an annual basis can vary from 2.6 to 4.2 kg/Mg. The tuber N content, with production of 75 Mg/ha, accounted for 250 to 280 kg N/ha for Russet Burbank and Hilite Russet cultivars, respectively. Corn and wheat are commonly used as rotational crops in potato production systems. The total N in the residues of the these crops account for 140 to 190 kg N/ha, respectively. The N mineralized from corn and wheat residues during the potato growing season (May through September contributes 70 to 85 kg N/ha. In arid, relatively warm production conditions under intensive irrigation as in the PNW, a clear understanding of the N contribution from crop residue mineralization is important for overall N management programs, to sustain optimal production of high quality tubers while minimizing potential negative environmental impacts.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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