Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of Water Table Managemet on Selected Physical Properties of a Hoytville Soil in Ohio

Authors
item Baker, Barbara - OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY
item Fausey, Norman
item Frey, S - OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: October 20, 2001
Publication Date: November 20, 2001
Citation: BAKER, B.J., FAUSEY, N.R., FREY, S.D. EFFECTS OF WATER TABLE MANAGEMET ON SELECTED PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF A HOYTVILLE SOIL IN OHIO. AGRONOMY ABSTRACTS. 2001. CD-ROM.

Technical Abstract: Drainage removes excess water allowing cultivation of fertile soil that would otherwise be too wet. In the North Central U.S. drainage began in the 1850s with the construction of large ditches that are still in use today. Today much of the area is also drained by underground pipes allowing for more rapid water removal. Removal of excess water is necessary for timely tillage and planting operations and root zone aeration. However, crop water stress in July and August also occurs frequently in this region. Subirrigation, returning water to the soil via subsurface drainage pipes, can prevent water stress thereby increasing yields. An experiment conducted in Wood County, Ohio was designed to examine the effect of subirrigation, controlled drainage, and conventional drainage on physical properties including bulk density, particle size, penetration resistance, aggregate stability and carbon content. Some producers have reported that more power is required when tilling subirrigated soils. Preliminary results indicate lower amounts of water stable aggregates from 40 to 70cm in soil that has been subirrigated for 9 years. Below 20cm, penetration resistance was also lower in plots that have been subirrigated than in plots that have been conventionally drained. Bulk density and particle size showed no clear trends at any depth.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page