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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Chicory and Plantain: Summer Grazing in the Northeastern U.S.

Authors
item Labreveux, Maria - PENN STATE UNIVERSITY
item Hall, Marvin - PENN STATE UNIVERSITY
item Sanderson, Matt

Submitted to: American Society of Agronomy Branch Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 25, 2001
Publication Date: September 25, 2001
Citation: LABREVEUX, M., HALL, M., SANDERSON, M.A. CHICORY AND PLANTAIN: SUMMER GRAZING IN THE NORTHEASTERN U.S.. NORTHEAST BRANCH OF AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRONOMY ABSTRACTS. P. 6. 2001.

Technical Abstract: Summer yields of forage chicory (Cichorium intybus) and plantain (Plantago lanceolata) can compare to those of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata). Our objectives were to develop grazing guidelines for these species for the Northeast U.S. In 1998, chicory cultivars (Forage Feast, L.E. Lacerta, Grasslands Puna), plantain cultivars (Grasslands Lancelot and Ceres Tonic), ,and Pennlate orchardgrass were subjected to four grazing treatments near State College, PA. Cultivars did not differ in dry matter (DM) production in spring, but in summer orchardgrass had higher yields. Puna and Lancelot had the highest survival rates. In 2000, Puna, Lancelot, and Pennlate were exposed to varying seasonal grazing frequencies and intensities. In spring, Puna and Lancelot yielded more than Pennlate (6.7, 5.6, and 3.6 t ha-1, p= 0.03). During summer, Puna produced the greatest yields, while Pennlate and Lancelot had similar yields. Plant survival was 95% for Puna and Pennlate but 50% for Lancelot. We conclude that Puna chicory can produce summer yields similar to orchardgrass and that varying the rest period by grazing at a proper canopy height improves persistence and productivity of chicory, plantain, and orchardgrass.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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