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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Bacterial, Fungal, and Viral Disease Resistance Loci Mapped in a Recombinant Inbred Common Bean Population ('Dorado'/xan 176)

Authors
item MIKLAS, PHILLIP
item Delorme, Richard
item Stone, Valerie - WHITEHEAD INSTITUTE MA
item Stavely, J
item Steadman, James - UNIV OF NEBRASKA LINCOLN
item Bassett, Mark - UNIV OF FLA GAINESVILLE
item Beaver, James - UNIV PUERTO RICO MAYAGUEZ

Submitted to: Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2000
Publication Date: November 1, 2000
Citation: MIKLAS, P.N., DELORME, R.M., STONE, V., STAVELY, J.R., STEADMAN, J.R., BASSETT, M.J., BEAVER, J.S. BACTERIAL, FUNGAL, AND VIRAL DISEASE RESISTANCE LOCI MAPPED IN A RECOMBINANT INBRED COMMON BEAN POPULATION ('DORADO'/XAN 176). JOURNAL OF AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HORTICULTURAL SCIENCES, 125:476-481. 2000.

Interpretive Summary: Efforts to develop multiple disease resistant cultivars of common bean (pintos, navy, green beans, etc.) is influenced by how close the resistance genes may be to one another on a chromosome. Information conerning this arrangement among the genes will aid the development of resistant cultivars. We positioned an array of genes conditioning resistance to fungal, bacterial, and viral diseases of common bean on a genetic linkage map. Many of the resistance genes were observed to occur in clusters. In some instances the genes that were clustered all had a positive influence on disease resistance. Additionally, some genes having a negative effect were intermingled within the resistance gene clusters. The associations among the different resistance genes described in this report will enable plant breeders to more efficiently develop cultivars with better genetic resistance. Genetic resistance provides a safe alternative to pesticides for control of most common bean diseases.

Technical Abstract: Understanding the genomic associations among disease resistance loci will facilitate breeding of multiple disease resistant cultivars. We constructed a genetic linkage map in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) containing six genes and nine quantitative trait loci (QTL) comprising resistance to one bacterial, three fungal, and two viral pathogens of bean. The mapping population consisted of 79 recombinant inbred lines derived from a 'Dorado'/XAN 176 hybridization. There were 147 RAPDs, two SCARs, one ISSR, two seed coat color genes rk and V, and the Asp gene conditioning seed brilliance, and two rust resistance genes. These markers mapped across eleven linkage groups, one linked triad, and seven linked pairs for an overall map length of 930 cM. Linkage among QTL for resistance to ashy stem blight, BGMV, and common bacterial blight on linkage group B7, and ashy stem blight, BGMV, and rust resistance loci on B4 will complicate breeding for combined resistance to all four pathogens in this population.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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