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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Distribution, Biology and Eficiency of the Vector of Tobacco Rattle Virus Causing Corky Ringspot Disease of Potato in the Pacific Northwest

Authors
item Mojtahedi, H - WSU IAREC PROSSER WA
item Santo, G - WSU IAREC PROSSER WA
item Thomas, Peter
item Crosslin, J - WSU IAREC PROSSER WA
item Brown, Charles

Submitted to: American Journal of Potato Research
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 15, 2001
Publication Date: December 15, 2001
Citation: MOJTAHEDI, H., SANTO, G.S., THOMAS, P.E., CROSSLIN, J.M., BROWN, C.R. DISTRIBUTION, BIOLOGY AND EFICIENCY OF THE VECTOR OF TOBACCO RATTLE VIRUS CAUSING CORKY RINGSPOT DISEASE OF POTATO IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF POTATO RESEARCH. 78:470. 2001.

Technical Abstract: Paratrichodorus allius was identified in 30% of soil samples collected from potato fields in Washington, Oregon, Idaho. Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) was transmitted to Samsun NN tobacco from only 10% of P. allius- infested soil samples. TRV caused typical symptoms on tobacco. Only 0-6% individual P. allius from potato fields expressing either severe or mild corky ringspot (CRS) symptoms transmitted TRV to tobacco. All viruliferous populations of P. allius, regardless of origin, transmitted TRV to Russet Burbank and Russet Norkotah potato tubers provided the soil moisture level in pot cultures was maintained at or above field capacity. The severity of CRS, however, depended on the virus isolate and vector density. In pot cultures, three P. allius/250 cm3 of soil was enough to initiate CRS on potato. Under field conditions, the tubers of Russet Burbank and Russet Norkotah developed 2 mo after planting, and quickly become vulnerable to P. allius feeding, and TRV infection. The severity of CRS increased for 35 and 50 days after the first detection of symptoms in Russet Norkotah and Russet Burbank tubers, respectively. P. allius populations remained low and unchanged during the growing season. The field observations confirmed our conclusions from greenhouse tests that potato tubers become vulnerable to TRV transmission soon after they are developed and should be protected from P. allius invasion for at least 8 weeks.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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