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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Quantitative Trait Loci (Qtl) Conditioning Resistance to White Mold in Common Bean

Authors
item MIKLAS, PHILLIP
item Riley, R - SYNGENTA NAMPA ID
item Grafton, K - NO DAK STATE UNIV FARGO
item Gepts, P - UNIV CALIF DAVIS

Submitted to: British Society of Plant Pathology Presidential Meeting
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2001
Publication Date: July 1, 2001
Citation: MIKLAS, P.N., RILEY, R.H., GRAFTON, K.F., GEPTS, P. QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCI (QTL) CONDITIONING RESISTANCE TO WHITE MOLD IN COMMON BEAN. BRITISH SOCIETY OF PLANT PATHOLOGY PRESIDENTIAL MEETING, Vol. 11, P. 59-60. 2001.

Interpretive Summary: White mold (Sclerotinia) is the most important disease of common bean (pinto, kidney, green beans, etc.) in the United States. The disease affects over 75% of the production acreage causing crop losses in excess of $50 million annually. Genetic resistance is an important component of integrated strategies used to control this disease. Breeding for improved resistance is difficult however because of its complexity. We are conducting molecular analyses to identify genes (quantitative trait loci, QTL) that influence reaction to white mold in order to gain a better understanding of the complex genetics involved in resistance. Thus far we have identified three QTL on linkage groups B6, B7, and B8, which conditioned physiological resistance in the field. The QTL have major effect; therefore, marker-assisted selection for them is plausible. These finding will help breeders to select for both physiological resistance and avoidance to enhance field resistance of common bean. Cultivars with improved resistance to white mold will alleviate economic hardship resulting from crop loss due to the disease, and result in additional savings for growers by reducing the number of chemical applications of fungicide needed to control the disease.

Technical Abstract: Breeding for resistance to white mold in common bean is complex because resistance is quantitatively inherited and confounded by avoidance traits. We have identified three QTL from two resistance sources that condition physiological resistance in the field. The putative QTL have major effect and may be amendable to marker-assisted selection.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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