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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Long-Term Soil Temperature Database, Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, Idaho, United States

Authors
item Seyfried, Mark
item Flerchinger, Gerald
item Murdock, Mark
item Hanson, Clayton
item Van Vactor, Steven

Submitted to: Water Resources Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 20, 2001
Publication Date: November 20, 2001
Citation: Seyfried, M.S., Flerchinger, G.N., Murdock, M.D., Hanson, C.L., Van Vactor, S., Long-term soil temperature database, Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, Idaho, United States. Water Resources Research 2001, v. 37, no. 11, p. 2843-2846.

Interpretive Summary: We describe long term soil temperature data collected at the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW). These data were collected for over 15 years at five locations representing different climatic regimes and soils in the RCEW. Soil temperature affects runoff, when the ground is frozen, and all biological processes. Seasonal variations in soil temperature have been widely documented, but year-to-year variations are not well know.This data provides insight into how climatic variability affects soil biological and physical processes.Measurements were made at several depths at each site to a depth of 180 cm in most cases. Each site is located in close proximity to a climate station. Descriptive soil profile information is also available for each site.We illustrate two aspects of the data set, the impact of snow depth on soil temperature, and the interannual variability of soil temperature at a site. These data are available to the public via the USDA-ARS Northwest Watershed Research Center anonymous ftp site ftp.nwrc.ars.usda.gov.

Technical Abstract: We describe long term soil temperature data collected at the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed(RCEW). These data were collected for over 15 years at five locations representing different climatic regimes and soils in the RCEW. Measurements were made at several depths at each site to a depth of 180 cm in most cases. Each site is located in close proximity to a aclimate station. Descriptive soil profile information is also available fo each site. We illustrate two aspects of the data set, the impact of snow depth on soil temperature, and the interannual variability of soil temperature at a site. These data are available to the public via the USDA- ARS Northwest Watershed Research Center anonymous ftp site ftp.nwrc.ars. usda.gov.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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