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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Influence of Agronomic Practices on P in Runoff from Poultry-Waste Amended Soils

Authors
item Han, F. - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV.
item Kingery, W. - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV.
item Oldham, J. - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV.
item Cos, M. - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV.
item MCGREGOR, KEITH
item Johnson, J. - MAFES
item Gerard, P. - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV.
item BRINK, GEOFFREY

Submitted to: Mississippi Water Resources Research Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2001
Publication Date: April 15, 2001

Interpretive Summary: Disposal of poultry manure without polluting surface water and groundwater is a problem. In this study, poultry manure was applied to ryegrass plots as a soil amendment to improve soil quality and as a fertilizer to increase crop production at a rate of 2.3 tons per acre in the fall and in the spring. Phosphorus levels in runoff leaving the plots were measured. Phosphorus concentrations in runoff from no-till plots from the first storm were high, but concentrations significantly decreased for all treatments for storms up to almost 200 days after manure was applied. The inorganic phosphorus released following a second application of poultry manure in the spring also decreased with time from the date of application. Although most of the inorganic phosphorus concentrations in runoff were relatively low, many exceeded United States Environmental Pollution Agency (USEPA)limits. Knowledge of these results will be beneficial to state and federal environmental protection agencies, conservationists, extension personnel, and farmers.

Technical Abstract: Disposal of poultry manure without polluting surface water and groundwater is a problem. In this study, poultry litter was applied to ryegrass plots as a soil amendment to improve soil quality and as a fertilizer to increase crop production. Inorganic phosphorus (P04) levels in runoff were measured after poultry litter was applied to ryegrass plots (3 management levels of ryegrass) at a rate of 5200 kilograms per hectare (kg/ha). Short fallow ryegrass plots were tilled with a rotary tiller near September 1, 1997 and planted immediately to ryegrass. Long-fallow plots remained fallow for another month when they were planted to ryegrass. No-till plots were planted, without major soil disturbance, to ryegrass the same day as the short-fallow plots. Inorganic phosphorus concentrations in runoff from the first storm ranged from 11 to 14 milligrams per liter (mg/L) of PO4 for no- till plots and from 8 to 11 mg/L of PO4 for long and short fallow plots. After the first storm, the concentrations significantly decreased for all treatments, averaging 1.4 mg/L of PO4 with a standard deviation of 1.1 mg/L of PO4 for storms up to almost 200 days after litter was applied. The inorganic phosphorus released following a second application of poultry manure in the spring also had decreasing PO4 concentrations with time from the date of application. Although most of the inorganic phosphorus concentrations in runoff were relatively low, many exceeded United States Environmental Pollution Agency (USEPA)limits of 3 mg/L of PO4. Knowledge of these results will be beneficial to state and federal environmental protection agencies, conservationists, extension personnel, and farmers.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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