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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Relations of Parental Obesity Status to Physical Activity and Fitness of Prepubertal Girls

Authors
item Treuth, Margarita - BAYLOR COLLEGE MED
item Butte, Nancy
item Puyau, Maurice - BAYLOR COLLEGE MED
item Adolph, Anne - BAYLOR COLLEGE MED

Submitted to: Pediatrics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 25, 2000
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: We explored whether physical activity and fitness differ among 101 white, black, and Hispanic 8 y old normal-weight girls whose parents are lean, obese, or both. Each child wore a heart rate monitor for two days, underwent a treadmill exercise test, answered an activity questionnaire, and completed 24-h total energy expenditure measurements. The amount of time spent above 125% and 150% of basal heart rate was calculated during each 24-hour period. We found that the times spent above 125% and 150% of basal resting heart rate were similar among children with lean, obese, or lean and obese parents. Black girls spent less time than did white girls on the weekend above 125% and 150% basal heart rate. No differences in fitness or habitual physical activity were observed between groups. Physical activity levels were related to time spent above 125% and 150% basal heart rate. Physical activity and fitness of normal-weight prepubertal girls predisposed to obesity did not differ from girls without a family history of obesity.

Technical Abstract: Objective: To determine whether physical activity and fitness differ among normal-weight-for-height, multiethnic, prepubertal girls whose parents are lean, obese, or both. Normal-weight white, black, and Hispanic prepubertal girls (mean age+/-standard deviation: 8.5+/-.4 years) participated in this study. Girls were recruited according to parental leanness or obesity defined as follows: girls with 2 lean parents (LN group; n=30); girls with 2 obese parents (OB group; n=27); and girls with 1 lean and 1 obese parent (LNOB group; n=44). Each child wore a heart rate monitor for two 24-hour periods, underwent a treadmill exercise test, answered an activity questionnaire, and completed energy expenditure measurements by basal calorimetry and doubly labeled water. The amount of time spent above 125% and 150% of basal heart rate (BHR) was calculated during each 24-hour period (n=84). Fitness (n=97), habitual physical activity (n=101), and physical activity level (PAL=total energy expenditure/basal metabolic rate n=101) were also measured. Results: The times spent above 125% and 150% of BHR were similar among LN, LNOB, and OB groups. Black girls spent less time than did white girls on the weekend above 125% BHR and above 150% BHR. No significant familial or ethnic differences in peak oxygen consumption or habitual physical activity were observed. PALs were as follows: LN=1.6 +/-.21; LNOB=1.64+/-.27; OB=1.58+/-.20; white=1.63+/-.23; black=1.58+/-.24 and Hispanic=1.65+/-.25. PAL was related to time spent above 125% BHR and 150% BHR (r=.31,.39). Conclusions: Physical activity and fitness of normal- weight prepubertal girls predisposed to obesity did not differ from girls without a family history of obesity.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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