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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Microarrays: Application to Soybean Gene Expression During Soybean Cyst Nematode Invasion

Author
item MATTHEWS, BENJAMIN

Submitted to: Advances in Phytochemistry
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: March 28, 2001
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Biochemical pathways producing secondary compounds in plants are complex and interactive. These pathways produce compounds that (1) defend the plant from pathogens and pests, (2) are necessary for cell wall formation and plant growth, and (3) are often of nutritive value to humans. Determining the pathways and regulatory control points for the synthesis of some secondary compounds will be difficult and require broad knowledge of interrelated pathways and enzymes, and specific knowledge of the biochemistry and molecular biology of the pathway under study. A new technique that will help researchers to study pathways synthesizing secondary compounds is the DNA microarray. DNA microarrays contain DNA of genes that are printed in a grid on a microscope slide. Microarrays are used to study the expression of the arrayed genes and can be used to help elucidate pathway interactions, and to determine the function of genes and proteins by determining the relative levels of expression of hundreds or even thousands of genes in parallel in a cell sample. In the future, it may be possible to equate gene expression with the synthesis of secondary compounds by using microarrays. Gene expression data combined with secondary compound profiles may elucidate pathways, relationships, and control elements, and provide new insight into the synthesis of secondary compounds. This manuscript is of value to researchers working in the area of secondary compound synthesis, because it provides information and insights involving the application of microarrays to the plant defense response.

Technical Abstract: Biochemical pathways producing secondary compounds in plants are complex and interactive. These pathways produce compounds that defend the plant from pathogens and pests, that are necessary for cell wall formation and plant growth, and that are often of nutritive value to humans. Determining the pathways and regulatory control points for the synthesis of some phytochemicals will be difficult and require broad knowledge of inter-related pathways and enzymes and specific knowledge of the biochemistry and molecular biology of the pathway under study. A new technique, microarrays, will help researchers decipher phytochemical pathways, elucidate pathway interactions, and determine the function of genes and proteins by providing expression data for hundreds or even thousands of genes in parallel in cell samples. In the future, it may be possible to equate gene expression with the synthesis of phytochemicals by using microarrays. Gene expression data combined with phytochemical profiles may elucidate pathways, relationships, and control elements, and provide new insight into the synthesis of phytochemicals. This manuscript is of value to researchers working in the area of secondary compound synthesis, because it provides information and insights involving the application of microarrays to phytochemistry.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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