Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Recovery of Commercially Produced Bacillus Thuringiensis Serovar Israelensis and Bacillus Sphaericus from Tires and Prevalence of Bacilli Inartificial and Natural Containers.

Authors
item Siegel, Joel
item Smith, Arnold - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
item Novak, Robert - ILLINOIS HISTORY SURVEY

Submitted to: Journal of the Mosquito Control Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 2000
Publication Date: January 20, 2001
Citation: Siegel, J.P., Smith, A.R., Novak, R.J. 2001. Recovery of commercially produced bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis and bacillus sphaericus from tires and prevalence of bacilli inartificial and natural containers. Journal of the Mosquito Control Association. Volume(17):33-41.

Interpretive Summary: We conducted surveys to identify the species of spore-forming bacteria present in natural artificial containers with an emphasis on two naturally occurring species and of larvicidal bacteria, Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis (BTI) and B sphaericus. Most of our samples came from Illinois. Identification was based on gas liquid chromatography and we could distinguish between bacteria that had a commercial or native origin. Native BTI was present at low levels in almost all habitats but was not recovered from bromeliads and metal containers. In temporary woodland pools, 27.9% of the colonies recovered were native BTI. We did not recover larvicidal B. sphaericus in untreated habitats. Two bacterial larvicides, VectoBac [registered] and VectoLex [registered], were applied to tires containing water. These tires were sampled three months and nine months after treatment. Isolates of BTI and B. sphaericus with commercial origin were recovered as long as nine months after application. We noticed numerous cadavers of the mosquito Aedes triseriatus in several tires nine months after treatment with VectoBac [registered]. We could not determine if this mortality resulted from recycling of BTI in these tires or whether insecticidal crystal proteins from the original treatment were resuspended. BTI isolates with commercial ancestry were recovered from untreated tires nine months after application. Isolates of larvicidal B. sphaericus that differed from the bacteria in VectoLex [registered] were also recovered from untreated tires.

Technical Abstract: We conducted surveys to identify the species of spore-forming bacteria present in natural and artificial containers. Most of our samples came from Illinois. Identification was based on gas cellular fatty acid (CFA) composition of the bacterial cell wall. In addition, we utilized a custom database for commercially produced strains of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis (BTI) and B. sphaericus, to differentiate between larvicidal isolates with commercial or native origin. Native BTI was present at low levels in almost all habitats but was not recovered from bromeliads and metal containers. In temporary woodland pools, 27.9% of the colonies were native BTI. We did not recover larvicidal B. spharericus in untreated habitats. VectoBac [registered] and VectoLex [registered] were applied to tires containing water and the tires were sampled 3 months and 9 months after treatment. Isolates of BTI and B. sphaericus with commercial origin were recovered as long as 9 months after application. We noticed numerous cadavers of Aedes triseriatus in several tires 9 months after treatment with VectoBac [registered]. We could not determine if this mortality resulted from recycling of BTI in these tires or whether insecticidal crystal proteins from the original treatment were resuspended. BTI isolates with commercial ancestry were recovered from untreated tires 9 months after application. Isolates with commercial ancestry were recovered from untreated tires 9 months after application. Isolates of larvicidal B. sphaericus that differed from the bacteria in VectoLex [registered] were also recovered from untreated tires.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page