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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Paddle Roll Gin Stand Performance

Authors
item Laird, Joseph
item Holt, Gregory
item Wedegaertner, Tom - COTTON INCORPORATED

Submitted to: ASAE Annual International Meeting
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 10, 2000
Publication Date: July 10, 2000
Citation: LAIRD, J.W., HOLT, G.A., WEDEGAERTNER, T. PADDLE ROLL GIN STAND PERFORMANCE. 2000. AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS. PAPER NO. 001148.

Interpretive Summary: Gin-run cottonseed contains some residual long fiber that amounts to 2.25 to 2.5 percent of the seed weight. A paddle roll gin stand was developed to regin seeds and remove the long fiber tags at high production rates necessary for an economical cottonseed coating operation. Research was conducted into use of a paddle roll gin stand technology to create a primary ginning device capable of getting all of the long lint into the bale at the original ginning operation. Results showed that the experimental gin stand removed the lint from the seeds that conventional gin stands normally leave. The additional lint amounts to approximately five percent more lint from the seed cotton into a standard 480 pound bale (20-25 pounds per bale). At prevailing cotton prices, this would be $10.00 to $12.00 more return per bale for the producer. Results also showed about a one-half staple length increase from the experimental gin stand in a side eby side ginning comparison with a modern high capacity gin stand. The average staple length improvement attained is worth approximately 1.5 cents per pound based on Lubbock spot market prices for April 2000, adding an additional $7.50 to the bale value. With an average 17 million bale crop, this is an additional 331.5 million dollars annually for U.S. cotton producers.

Technical Abstract: A new saw type gin stand design was developed with a paddle roll device to turn the roll and a rotating seed finger device to control the exit of seeds from the ginning roll. Two ginning tests showed that the experimental paddle roll gin stand consistently produced approximately five percent more lint from the seed cotton compared to a modern high capacity gin stand. Fiber data also showed some difference in fiber properties and a tendency for the experimental gin to give better staple length. More research is needed, but the new technology promises to substantially benefit cotton producers. The gin stand technology development effort was successful and a patent was obtained through the USDA-ARS patent division to disclose the paddle roll gin stand technology to the industry.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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