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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Cellulosic Fiber Gels Prepared from the Cell Walls of Maize Hulls

Authors
item Inglett, George
item Carriere, Craig

Submitted to: Cereal Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 14, 2001
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Technologies to generate new fat replacements represent value-added opportunities for high soluble fiber cereal grains and better nutritional choices for the American public. Technical problems to be resolved involve the processing and preparation of soluble fiber components from cereals to give fat replacers. Such soluble fiber fat replacers have the added advantage of lowering blood cholesterol, contributed to their high beta-glucan content. This report summarizes the development of a new, patented fat replacer produced from the hulls of corn. This material, designated as Z-Trim, has already received inquiries from a number of companies interested in pursuing licenses.

Technical Abstract: Cellulosic fiber gel substances were prepared from maize hulls by chemically and physically treating the pericarp cell wall substrate in a multistage process to disintegrate their morphological cellular structure. Thermal alkaline degradation was used with impact shear in the first stage followed by alkaline peroxidation and shear in the second stage. The degradation products were removed in the liquid supernatants at each stage. Their high viscosities and hydration capacities characterize the maize fiber gels. After drying, they can be reconstituted by using shear forces to the original gel form. The fiber gels were also co-dried with hydrophilic materials to make their reconstitution to gel form easier. The alkaline extracted hemicellulose effluents from the fiber gel preparation, including the second stage peroxidized extract, were purified and used as a co-dried hydrophilic material. Also, an amylodextrin, oat flour hydrolysate, was used as a hydrophilic material.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014