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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Soil Interface Friction at High Normal Stresses

Authors
item Adams, Brian - CASE CORPORATION
item Way, Thomas

Submitted to: Soil Dynamics International Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 5, 2001
Publication Date: January 29, 2001
Citation: Adams, B.T., Way, T.R. 2001. Soil interface friction at high normal stresses. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Soil Dynamics, March 26-30, 2000, Adelaide, Australia. p. 63-70.

Interpretive Summary: Efficient performance of agricultural vehicles on soil is important in reducing inputs and improving profitability of agricultural production. Friction of rubber tires, rubber tracks, and steel tracks on soil is fundamental to the traction and performance of agricultural vehicles and other vehicles which run on soil. Equations describing the friction of rubber and steel on soil were determined for a clay, a clay loam, and a sandy loam soil. Equations which are mathematically simpler than a previously published equation were found to be useful for some conditions. These results are expected to be useful to designers of tires, tracks, tractors, and other agricultural vehicles as new designs are developed to improve the efficiency and performance of agricultural equipment.

Technical Abstract: Friction of rubber tires, rubber tracks, and steel tracks on soil is fundamental to the traction and performance of agricultural vehicles and other vehicles which run on soil. Mathematical models of the friction of rubber and steel on soil were examined at normal stresses from 100 to 700 kPa. This range of normal stresses includes typical stresses occurring when agricultural tires and tracks operate on soil. Mathematical models were developed for a clay, a clay loam, and a sandy loam soil. Models with fewer terms than a previously published model were found to be useful for some conditions. The adhesive component of the models was found to increase as the normal stress level increased. These results are expected to be useful to designers of tires, tracks, tractors, and other agricultural vehicles as new designs are developed to improve the efficiency and performance of agricultural equipment.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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