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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of Trace Mineral Supplementation on Cow-Calf Performance, Reproduction, and Immune Function

Authors
item Stanton, Tim - COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY
item Whittier, Jack - COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY
item Geary, Thomas
item Kimberling, C - COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY
item Johnson, A - ZINPRO CORPORATION

Submitted to: Professional Animal Scientist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2000
Publication Date: June 1, 2000
Citation: STANTON, T.L., WHITTIER, J.C., GEARY, T.W., KIMBERLING, C.V., JOHNSON, A.B. EFFECTS OF TRACE MINERAL SUPPLEMENTATION ON COW-CALF PERFORMANCE, REPRODUCTION, AND IMMUNE FUNCTION. PROFESSIONAL ANIMAL SCIENTIST. 2000. v. 16. p. 121-127.

Interpretive Summary: Supplementing elevated levels of trace minerals to deficient cows (based on liver biopsies) appeared to have little impact on cow body weight and condition score change. Organic trace mineral supplementation enhanced early reproductive performance and calf average daily gain, compared with inorganic trace mineral supplementation.

Technical Abstract: Three hundred Angus cows were used in a randomized design to evaluate tract mineral supplementation over a 209-d trial on cow and calf performance, liver trace mineral content, and immune function. Treatments included the following supplemental trace minerals: 1) inorganic trace minerals-low level; 2) inorganic trace minerals-high level; and 3) organic trace minerals-high level. Cows fed the high level of inorganic trace minerals lost more weight (P<0.05) than cows fed the other treatments. Cow condition score was not affected by treatment. Calf average daily gain on the organic high level of trace minerals was higher (P<0.05) from birth to May 13 and May 13 to September 24 compared with the other treatments. Pregnancy rate to artificial insemination was higher (P<0.05) when cows were fed the organic high level of trace minerals compared with the other treatments. Trace mineral supplementation had an equivocal impact on liver trace minerals over time. Cell-mediated immune function was not affected by type or level of trace mineral supplementation.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014
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