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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Physiological Changes in Catfish Ictalurus Punctatus Caused by Exposure to Waterborne Potassium Permanganate

Authors
item Griffin, Billy
item Davis, Ken - UNIV OF MEMPHIS
item Darwish, Ahmed
item Straus, David

Submitted to: Aquaculture America Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 21, 2001
Publication Date: January 21, 2001
Citation: GRIFFIN, B.R., DAVIS, K.B., DARWISH, A.M., STRAUS, D.L. PHYSIOLOGICAL CHANGES IN CATFISH ICTALURUS PUNCTATUS CAUSED BY EXPOSURE TO WATERBORNE POTASSIUM PERMANGANATE. AQUACULTURE CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS. 2001. p.260.

Technical Abstract: Potassium permanganate is used as a disease treatment in cultured fish. Prolonged exposure does not lead to changes in tissue concentrations of manganese; however, in high concentrations the chemical is toxic to fish. This study was to determine the effect of acute exposure to KMnO4 on stress and toxicity indicators. Exposure to 0.44, 1.32 or 2.19 mg KMnO4/L for 36 h resulted in 0, 9.4%, and 49.6% mortality. The higher exposure rates caused increases in plasma cortisol and glucose, and reductions in plasma chlorides and osmolality. Erythrocyte packed cell volumes (PCV) increased at the higher exposure rates, but total RBC counts did not change. All blood parameters except PCV returned to normal within 48 h after exposure; PCVs were normal within 96 h after exposure. The cause of mortality is suggested by changes in PCV, plasma osmolality, and plasma chloride concentrations. Increases in PCV can be brought about by erythropoeisis or by cellular swelling. There was no increase in RBC counts suggesting the increased PCVs are due to RBC swelling. The reductions in plasma osmolality and chloride indicate a loss of plasma protein with dilution of the plasma leading to an osmotic imbalance resulting in RBC swelling. Loss of plasma electrolytes, as indicated by reductions in osmolality and chlorides, could result in cardiac or other organ failure.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014
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