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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Crop Utilization and Environmental Fate of N and P from Soils Receiving Manure from Swine Fed Diets Containing Traditional Or Highly Available Phosphorus Corn

Authors
item Paschold, Julie
item Wienhold, Brian
item Gilley, John
item Ferguson, R - UNIV OF NE-CLAY CENTER
item Miller, P - UNIV OF NE, LINCOLN

Submitted to: Animal, Agricultural and Food Processing Wastes Symposium
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 15, 2000
Publication Date: September 1, 2000
Citation: PASCHOLD, J.S., WIENHOLD, B.J., GILLEY, J.E., FERGUSON, R.B., MILLER, P.S. CROP UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL FATE OF N AND P FROM SOILS RECEIVING MANURE FROM SWINE FED DIETS CONTAINING TRADITIONAL OR HIGHLY AVAILABLE PHOSPHORUS CORN. ANIMAL, AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD PROCESSING WASTES SYMPOSIUM. PP. 425-432. 2000.

Interpretive Summary: Swine manure contains nitrogen and phosphorus and can serve as an organic fertilizer source for crops. The most economical method of applying manure is at a rate that meets the nitrogen needs of the crop. Manure from swine fed a traditional corn diet contains more phosphorus than a crop can utilize when that manure is applied to meet the nitrogen needs. This results in a buildup of phosphorus and an increase in the potential for negative environmental impacts. Highly Available Phosphorus corn varieties are being developed. Feeding these varieties to swine results in a lower phosphorus content in the manure. This manure provides sufficient nitrogen and phosphorus to the crop but reduces the rate at which phosphorus accumulates in the soil. Lower soil phosphorus contents lowers the amount of phosphorus lost in runoff.

Technical Abstract: We compared crop utilization of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) applied as manure from swine fed a Highly Available Phosphorus (HAP) corn diet, manure from swine fed a traditional corn (TC) diet, and that applied as inorganic fertilizer (IF). We also collected runoff samples at one site to assess the potential HAP corn had in reducing runoff losses of P from manured fields. Crop utilization of N and P was higher for HAP manure than for TC manure or IF when incorporated after application. Utilization of N was similar among fertilizer treatments and utilization of P appeared to be related to application rate when surface applied to a no-tillage field. Dissolved P losses in runoff were lowest from HAP plots. Organic N accounted for most N loss in runoff. First year results suggest that manure from swine fed a HAP corn diet is a good fertilizer N and P source and has potential for reducing environmental contamination associated with runoff from manured fields.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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