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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Experimental Study of Infiltration into a Bean Stubble Field During Seasonal Freeze-Thaw Period

Authors
item Xiuging, Zheng - TAIYUAN UNIV OF TECH
item Van Liew, Mike - OREGON WATER RESOURCES
item Flerchinger, Gerald

Submitted to: Soil Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 13, 2000
Publication Date: September 20, 2001
Citation: Xiuging, Z., Van Liew, M.W., and Flerchinger, G.N. 2001. Experimental study of infiltration into a bean stubble field during seasonal freeze-thaw period. Soil Science 166:3-10

Interpretive Summary: Infiltration characteristics of frozen soils are of prime interest for a variety of concerns, including water conservation, runoff, flooding and erosion. Although frozen soil infiltration is typically not associated with irrigation practices, winter and spring irrigation in northern and northwestern China is mostly conducted during the freeze-thaw period when water is available. The shortage of water resources is an important factor affecting and restricting development of crop and livestock in northern and northwestern parts of China. Therefore, improving irrigation efficiency and determining irrigation parameters has become a key problem for agricultural management. This paper examines the infiltration characteristics during different freeze-thaw stages through the winter based on water infiltration in a green bean standing stubble field. Results from this study have practical significance for directing the winter and spring irrigation in seasonally frozen soil areas and also have hydrologic implications for predicting runoff and flooding associated with rainfall and snowmelt on frozen soil.

Technical Abstract: Infiltration characteristics of frozen soils are of prime interest for a variety of concerns, including water conservation, runoff, flooding and erosion. Although frozen soil infiltration is typically not associated with irrigation practices, winter and spring irrigation in northern and northwestern China is mostly conducted during the freeze-thaw period when water is available. The shortage of water resources is an important factor affecting and restricting development of crop and livestock in northern and northwestern parts of China. This paper examines the infiltration characteristics during different freeze-thaw stages through the winter based on water infiltration in a green bean standing stubble field. The variation in 90-minute cumulative infiltration capacity and final infiltration rate was examined for the transient freeze-thaw stage, the steady freezing stage, and the thawing stage. Results showed that during the transient freezing stage, the effect of the frozen layer on infiltration characteristics was limited only at the beginning of infiltration. During the steady freezing stage, cumulative infiltration and final infiltration rate decreased as soil frost depth increased. During the thawing stage, cumulative infiltration and final infiltration rate increased with increase in thaw depth. The exchanges of water and heat between surface soil and atmosphere and the phase change of soil water were the main reasons for the variation in infiltration characteristics. Results from this study have practical significance for directing the winter and spring irrigation in seasonally frozen soil areas and also have hydrologic implications for predicting runoff and flooding associated with rainfall and snowmelt on frozen soil.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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