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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Influence of Scalding Picking and Chilling on the Recovery of Salmonella from Broiler Skin

Authors
item Buhr, Richard
item Berrang, Mark
item Campbell, T - SUMMER STUDENT 1999
item Wortham, K - FOOD SAFETY & INSPECTION

Submitted to: World Poultry Congress Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 26, 2000
Publication Date: August 20, 2000
Citation: BUHR, R.J., BERRANG, M.E., CAMPBELL, T.J., WORTHAM, K.J. THE INFLUENCE OF SCALDING PICKING AND CHILLING ON THE RECOVERY OF SALMONELLA FROM BROILER SKIN. WORLD POULTRY CONGRESS PROCEEDINGS. 2000.

Technical Abstract: To evaluate the persistence of the foodborne pathogen Salmonella during poultry processing, broilers were contaminated with a marker strain of Salmonella on the breast. Skin samples were collected before scalding, and after scalding, picking, and chilling. Half of the carcasses were hard scalded (56.7 C) and the remainder soft (53.3 C) scalded. From all 12 samples collected prior to scalding, Salmonella was detected by direct plating (log 2.7-3.6 cfu/sample). Only 2/6 samples collected after soft scalding were positive by direct plating (log 1.0 and 1.5 cfu/sample), and all other samples were negative. Following enrichment, all samples collected before or after scalding were salmonella positive (24/24). However, after picking and chilling, those carcasses that were soft scalded had higher incidence of Salmonella (5/12) than those that were hard scalded (1/12). Salmonella was detected on the skin surface before and after hard or soft scalding, but after picking and chilling, Salmonella was detected only on soft-scalded carcasses. These results indicate that the combined processing steps of hard scalding and picking can decrease the level of Salmonella recovered from breast skin.

Last Modified: 7/31/2014
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