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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Selection for Bean Golden Mosaic Resistance in Intra-Racial and Inter Racial Bean Populations

Authors
item Singh, S - UNIV OF IDAHO
item Morales, F - CIAT, COLOMBIA
item Miklas, Phillip
item Teran, H - CIAT, COLOMBIA

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 1999
Publication Date: January 1, 2000
Citation: SINGH, S., MORALES, F.J., MIKLAS, P.N., TERAN, H. SELECTION FOR BEAN GOLDEN MOSAIC RESISTANCE IN INTRA-RACIAL AND INTER-RACIAL BEAN POPULATIONS. CROP SCIENCE, 40:1565-1572. 2000.

Interpretive Summary: Bean golden mosaic, caused by a gemini-virus, is the most important disease in Latin America, and is an emerging disease problem in Florida and the southeastern United States. Yield losses resulting from this disease in Florida alone is estimated at $2 million annually. This research illustrates the importance of combining resistance genes from different genetic backgrounds in order to obtain a more effective level of bean golden mosaic resistance for prevention of yield loss and reduction of pesticide use. The benefit of two DNA markers linked with bean genes in the development of these more resistant lines was also demonstrated. Information generated and resistant lines developed from this research will provide breeders with new strategies and germplasm, and growers with improved cultivars for combating this devastating disease. Disease resistance will reduce yield loss and provide for a safer environment and food source through the reduced need for pesticide applications to control insect vectors which spread the disease.

Technical Abstract: Bean golden mosaic (BGM) resistance within any one bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) race is inadequate. Pyramiding genes from races would increase resistance and reduce pesticide use. Our objectives were to pyramid and compare BGM resistance of lines from intraracial versus interracial populations, and verify pyramided resistance using markers. One intraracial and four interracial populations were developed at CIAT in 1992. Plants within each F1-derived F2 family were advanced in bulk, and grown under common bacterial blight (CBB) and angular leaf spot (ALS pressure. Single plant selections were made and harvested in bulk for screening for ALS, bean common mosaic (BCM), BGM, and CBB in 1995. The 39 selected lines, 12 parents, and 6 checks were again evaluated for the 4 diseases in 1998. Seventeen of 39 lines and parents and checks were also screened for the RAPD OR2 and SCAR SW12 markers lined with bgm-1 gene and a aQTL controlling BGM resistance, respectively, at USDA-ARS,Prosser in 1999. Five lines with the highest resistance were obtained from GV 10626 and GV 10627. Three of these lines possessed OR2 and SW12 markers lined with resistance derived from 'Garrapato' and 'Porrillo Sintetico', respectively. All lines possessed I gene for BCM resistance and were resistant or intermediate to ALS. Five of 17 lines were also intermediate for CBB. Use of interracial populations and combined use of markers and disease screening should be emphasized for resistance breeding.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014