Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Monitoring Physical and Biological Properties at the Sevilleta Lter Using Remote Sensing

Authors
item Ritchie, Jerry
item Schmugge, Thomas
item Rango, Albert
item Schiebe, Frank - SST DEV GROUP, OKLAHOMA

Submitted to: International Association of Hydrological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 3, 2000
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Remote sensing measurements have been made at Sevilleta Long-Term Ecological Research Program, Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, in the Spring and Fall of 1997, 1998, and 1999, to measure differences between grass and shrub communities. Reflected solar radiation was 12 to 40 percent at the shrub site when compared with the grass site. Landscape surface temperatures, which were similar in the morning, were 3 to 5 degrees Celsius higher under the shrub when compared with the grass site by 1:00 p.m. local time. The shrub site had a lower Leaf Area Index indicating lower ground cover at the shrub site giving a higher soil contribution to the total reflected solar radiation measured. These differences could have significant effects on the energy and water balances of the Sevilleta site as the shrub communities continue to expand at the expense of the grassland.

Technical Abstract: In 1997, the USDA Agriculture Research Service, Hydrology Laboratory began collecting remotely sensed ground, aircraft, and satellite data on the physical and biological states of two semi-ecosystems (grass and shrub) typical of the Sevilleta Long-Term Ecological Research Program site. Remote sensing measurements were made at Sevilleta in May/June and in September/October of 1997, 1998, and 1999. Radiance, measured at ground an aircraft platforms, was 12 to 40 percent higher for a 30-meter squared area at the shrub site when compared with the grass site. Landscape surface temperatures were similar in the morning but were 3 to 5 degrees Celsius higher under the shrub when compared with the grass site by 1:00 p.m. local time. The shrub site had a lower Leaf Area Index indicating lower surface cover at the shrub site giving a higher soil contribution to the total radiance measured. These differences could have significant effects on the energy and water balances of the Sevilleta site if shrubs continue to expand at the expense of the grassland.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page