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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Peanut Roast Color and Sensory Attribute Relationships

Authors
item Pattee, Harold
item Sanders, Timothy
item Isleib, Thomas - NC STATE UNIVERSITY
item Giesbrecht, Francis - NC STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: February 15, 2000
Publication Date: June 1, 2000
Citation: PATTEE, H.E., SANDERS, T.H., ISLEIB, T.G., GIESBRECHT, F.G. PEANUT ROAST COLOR AND SENSORY ATTRIBUTE RELATIONSHIPS. AMES, J.M., HOFMANN, T.F., EDITORS. AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY, WASHINGTON, DC. CHEMISTRY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF SELECTED FOOD COLORANTS. ACS SYMPOSIUM SERIES 775. 2000. P. 187-200.

Interpretive Summary: Peanut roasting develops not only a pleasing sensory flavor but a pleasing color. In studying the genetic relationships between sensory attributes and peanut lines, roast color of the peanut paste test sample is an important source of variability that must be considered. Intensity of the roasted peanut sensory attribute has a quadratic relationship to CIELAB L* with an optimum for roast color at 58.7. Across years, the optimum value generally ranged from 57.1 to 59.5. The Virginia and Spanish-Valencia market-types have similar roasted peanut to roast color regression curves while the runner market-type had a broader curve. Sweetness increased slightly as roasting progressed, astringency moderately, and bitterness at the highest rate. Peanut market-types varied in their effect on the intensity and rate of change in the sensory attributes. Differences in the roasted peanut quality of the peanut market-types point to the importance of cooperative efforts between plant breeders and food scientists to ensure that when new varieties are released they not only have superior agronomic characteristics, but also maintain or improve upon the flavor quality characteristics.

Technical Abstract: Peanut roasting develops not only a pleasing sensory flavor but also a pleasing color. In studying the genetic relationships between sensory attributes and peanut genotypes, roast color of the peanut paste test sample is an important source of variability that must be considered. Intensity of the roasted peanut sensory attribute has a quadratic relationship to CIELAB L* with an optimum for roast color at 58.7. Across years, the optimum value generally ranged from 57.1 to 59.5. The Virginia and Spanish-Valencia market-types have similar roasted peanut to roast color regression curves while the runner market-type had a broader curve. Sweetness increased slightly as roasting progressed, astringency moderately, and bitterness at the highest rate. Peanut market-types varied in their effect on the intensity and rate of change in the sensory attributes. Differences in the roasted peanut quality of the peanut market- -types point to the importance of cooperative efforts between plant breeder and food scientists to ensure that when new varieties are released, they not only have superior agronomic characteristics, but also maintain or improve upon the flavor quality characteristics.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014