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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Phosphorus: What Happens in the Soil?

Authors
item Bowman, Rudolph
item Vigil, Merle

Submitted to: Colorado Conservation Tillage Association Annual Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 10, 2000
Publication Date: January 1, 2000

Interpretive Summary: Producers need to apply P fertilizer for optimal grain production in the central Great Plains. Application is complicated not only by amounts of P needed for a specific crop, but also by sources of P, time and method of application, and interpretation of soil test values. To better understand this decision process, producers need to know what happens to fertilizer P Pwhen it reaches the soil, and how best they can manage that fertilizer. Fate of P under different management scenarios is presented along with a discussion of soil testing methods, and interpretation of P fertility indices used in the Great Plains.

Technical Abstract: Phosphorus is the second most limiting nutrient for cereal production in the Great Plains. Producers in the high Plains need to apply P fertilizer for optimal grain production and profit. This application, however, is complicated not only by amounts of P needed for a specific crop, but also by sources of P, time and method of application, sampling methodologies, and interpretation of soil test values. Many pressing questions exist for the producers as to the fate of P once it gets into the soil, and how best they can manage that P. Different management scenarios for optimal P use are presented along with a discussion of the various common terms encountered in P fertility technology. Additionally, soil testing methods, and interpretation of P fertility indices used in the Great Plains are presented.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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