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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Breeding for Resistance to Nematode Caused Problems of Potatoes

Authors
item Brown, Charles
item Mojthedi, H - WSU, PROSSER, WA
item Santo, G - WSU, PROSSER, WA
item Hamm, Phil - OSU, HERMISTON, OR
item Crosslin, James
item Thomas, Peter

Submitted to: Potato Conference and Trade Fair Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: June 11, 1999
Publication Date: September 17, 1999
Citation: BROWN, C.R., MOJTHEDI, H., SANTO, G.S., HAMM, P., CROSSLIN, J., THOMAS, P.E. BREEDING FOR RESISTANCE TO NEMATODE CAUSED PROBLEMS OF POTATOES. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL WASHINGTON STATE POTATO CONFERENCE. P 79-86. 1999.

Interpretive Summary: Potato production in the Columbia Basin of Washington State and Oregon is exposed to losses caused by two nematodes. Columbia root-knot nematode reproduces on the roots producing egg masses that give rise to newly hatched juveniles. These juveniles invade potato tubers producing brown spots in the flesh that prevent the potato from being used either for fresh market consumption or in processed products. The second problem is caused by the infection of the potato tuber by a virus, tobacco rattle virus. The virus is harbored and transmitted to the plant by a different nematode called the stubby root. The virus infection results in patches and streaks of darkened tissue throughout the tuber flesh, a disease which is called Corky ringspot. At present the only means to control these nematodes by applying strong chemical fumigants to the soil at a cost of about 300 dollars per acre. Our breeding efforts are directed at producing new varieties with combined resistance to the nematodes. We have been able to find resistance to the Columbia root-knot nematode in wild species in Mexico. The genetic factors controlling resistance have been localized to chromosome 11 and molecular mapping markers used to assist in introducing this resistance into potato breeding lines with commercial attributes. Resistance to corky ringspot has also been found and through traditional breeding is being introduced to breeding lines alone and in combination with resistance to Columbia root- knot nematode.

Technical Abstract: Potato production in the Columbia Basin of Washington State and Oregon is exposed to losses caused by two nematodes. Columbia root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne chitwoodi) reproduces on the roots producing egg masses that give rise to newly hatched juveniles. These juveniles invade potato tubers producing brown spots in the flesh that prevent the potato from being used either for fresh market consumption or in processed products. The second problem is caused by the infection of the potato tuber by a virus, tobacco rattle virus. The virus is harbored and transmitted to the plant by a different nematode called the stubby root nematode (Paratrichodorus allius). The virus infection results in patches and streaks of darkened tissue throughout the tuber flesh, a disease which is called Corky ringspot. At present the only means to control these nematodes by applying strong chemical fumigants to the soil at a cost of about 300 dollars per acre. Our breeding efforts are directed at producing new varieties with combined resistance to the nematodes. We have been able to find resistance to the Columbia root-knot nematode in wild species in Mexico namely Solanum bulbocastanum and S. hougasii. The genetic factors controlling resistance have been localized to chromosome 11 and molecular mapping markers used to assist in introducing this resistance into potato breeding lines with commercial attributes. The fact that we have found the resistance on

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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