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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Prevention of Ichthyophthiriasis in Channel Catfish and Blue Tilapia by Treatment with Potassium Permangenate.

Authors
item Straus, David
item Griffin, Billy

Submitted to: Book of Abstracts World Aquaculture Society
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 20, 2000
Publication Date: May 2, 2000
Citation: STRAUS, D.L., GRIFFIN, B.R. PREVENTION OF ICHTHYOPHTHIRIASIS IN CHANNEL CATFISH AND BLUE TILAPIA BY TREATMENT WITH POTASSIUM PERMANGENATE.. BOOK OF ABSTRACTS WORLD AQUACULTURE SOCIETY. 2000. p.683.

Interpretive Summary: Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) is a common obligate protozoan parasite that invades the skin and gills of many species of freshwater fish. Potassium permanganate has been used in the past to control infestations of Ich, but its toxicity to the free-swimming infective stage (theront) is not known. The purpose of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of potassium permanganate to the ich theront and the effective concentration needed to prevent an initial infestation of Ich in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and blue tilapia (Tilapia aurea). In the initial experiment, theronts were exposed to concentrations of potassium permanganate in 100 ul of well water in a 96-well plate in (n-3) and observed for 4 hrs to determine acute toxicity. A concentration of 0.9 mg/L potassium permanganate caused mortality of >95% of the theronts by hr hrs. In the next experiment, fingerling channel catfish were exposed to at least 10,000 theronts/L of well water and immediately treated with potassium permanganate (n=3). Infestation was observed in controls at day 7 after exposure. The lowest effective dose of potassium permanganate was 1.0 mg/L in well water. In the final experiment, fingerling blue tilapia were exposed and treated as above. Infestation was observed in controls at day 9 after exposure. The lowest effective dose of potassium permanganate was 0.5 mg/L in well water.

Technical Abstract: Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) is a common obligate protozoan parasite that invades the skin and gills of many species of freshwater fish. Potassium permanganate has been used in the past to control infestations of Ich, but its toxicity to the free-swimming infective stage (theront) is not known. The purpose of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of potassium permanganate to the ich theront and the effective concentration needed to prevent an initial infestation of Ich in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and blue tilapia (Tilapia aurea). In the initial experiment, theronts were exposed to concentrations of potassium permanganate in 100 ul of well water in a 96-well plate in (n-3) and observed for 4 hrs to determine acute toxicity. A concentration of 0.9 mg/L potassium permanganate caused mortality of >95% of the theronts by hr hrs. In the next experiment, fingerling channel catfish were exposed to at least 10,000 theronts/L of well water and immediately treated with potassium permanganate (n=3). Infestation was observed in controls at day 7 after exposure. The lowest effective dose of potassium permanganate was 1.0 mg/L in well water. In the final experiment, fingerling blue tilapia were exposed and treated as above. Infestation was observed in controls at day 9 after exposure. The lowest effective dose of potassium permanganate was 0.5 mg/L in well water.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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