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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Recent Advances in the Carcinogenicity and Toxicity of the Mycotoxin Fumonisin B1

Authors
item Voss, Kenneth
item Haschek-Hock, Wanda - VET MED, U ILL, URBANA
item Dragan, Y - PUB HEALTH, OHIO ST U

Submitted to: Toxicologist
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 1, 1999
Publication Date: March 1, 2000

Interpretive Summary: Symposium to be held during the annual meeting of the Society of Toxicology, Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, March 19-23, 2000. Developed by Kenneth A. Voss and Co-Chaired by all three authors.

Technical Abstract: Fumonisins are produced by Fusarium moniliforme (recently reclassified as F. verticillioides) and F. proliferatum, fungi commonly found on corn. They are suspected carcinogens which affect populations utilizing contaminated corn as a dietary staple. Fumonisin B1 (FB1), the most thoroughly studied fumonisin, causes the species-specific toxicities elicited by F. verticillioides in farm and laboratory animals. On the molecular level, fumonisins disrupt sphingolipid metabolism by inhibiting ceramide synthase. Apoptosis is an early cytotoxic event following fumonisin exposure. These findings are significant not only for mycotoxicology, but also for understanding fundamental toxicological principles. The aim of this symposium is to explore how fumonisins can be used to investigate connections between carcinogenicity, cytotoxicity and apoptosis, and specific biomolecular events. Specific topics to be covered are: the liver and kidney tumorigenic effects of FB1 in rats and mice; the role of apoptosis as an early event in fumonisin toxicity; the use of FB1 as a model for the role of apoptosis in nongenotoxic carcinogenesis and its implications for evaluating risk; the use of fumonisins as research tools for studying sphingolipid-mediated cell regulatory functions, including those governing apoptosis and mitosis; and, to show how integrated strategy combining biochemical, physiological and pathological approaches can be used to study in vivo mechanisms of toxicity and interspecies differences.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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