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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Ability of Oleic Acid to Inhibit the Growth of Bacteria Isolated from the Skin of Processed Broilers

Authors
item Hinton, Jr, Arthur
item Ingram, Kimberly

Submitted to: American Society of Microbiologists Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 4, 2000
Publication Date: May 22, 2000
Citation: HINTON JR, A., INGRAM, K.D. ABILITY OF OLEIC ACID TO INHIBIT THE GROWTH OF BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM THE SKIN OF PROCESSED BROILERS. AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MICROBIOLOGISTS ABSTRACTS. 2000.

Technical Abstract: The ability of oleic acid to inhibit the growth of bacteria isolated from the skin of broiler carcasses was determined. Skin from processed carcasses were rinsed in peptone water, and rinsates were plated on bacteriological agar. After incubation, colonies were removed from the plates and identified. Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus lentus were isolated. Salmonella typhimurium was also included in the study. Isolates were grown in Trypticase Soy Broth, centrifuged and washed in peptone water. Tubes containing 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10% oleic acid were inoculated with each isolate. After mixing for 5 min, bacteria were enumerated. Significantly fewer CFU/ml of E. faecalis, L. monocytogenes, P. aeruginosa and S. lentus were recovered from 2% oleic acid than from the control. No E. faecalis or L. monocytogenes were recovered from 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10% oleic acid, and no E. coli or P. aeruginosa were recovered from 10% oleic acid. E. cloacae, S. typhimurium, and S. lentus were isolated from 10% oleic acid, however. E. cloacae, S. typhimurium, and S. lentus were also mixed in solutions of 0 or 10% oleic acid for 0, 30, 60, 90, or 120 min. There were significant reductions in the number of S. typhimurium recovered from 10% oleic acid after 30 min, and no S. typhimurium were recovered after 60 min. There were also significant reductions in the number of E. cloacae and S. lentus recovered after 60 min in 10% oleic acid. Findings indicate that oleic acid is bactericidal towards several bacteria found on poultry carcasses and that the bactericidal activity can be increased by prolonging the exposure time.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014