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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns of Salmonella Isolates Collected from Slaughter Age Pigs

Authors
item Cray, Paula
item Bahnson, P - U OF ILL
item Ladely, Scott

Submitted to: International Symposium on Epidemiology and Control of Salmonella in Pork
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 4, 1999
Publication Date: August 5, 1999
Citation: Cray, P.J., Bahnson, P.B., Ladely, S.R. 1999. Antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella isolates collected from slaughter age pigs. International Symposium on Epidemiology and Control of Salmonella in Pork. p. 245-247.

Technical Abstract: Salmonella are ubiquitous in nature and are recovered from many animal species including swine. However, prevalence of specific serotypes can vary (1). Although carriage is often observed, fecal shedding can be sporadic (2). Salmonella, as well as other food borne pathogens, can be transferred from animals to the human population. However, since the federally mandated HACCP program has been implemented, a reduction in Salmonella among the major food animals has been observed (3). Most swine that carry Salmonella do not exhibit clinical signs of illness and treatment is not indicated. However, antimicrobics are used in swine production for the treatment and prevention of illness as well as for growth promotion. Use of antimicrobics in some cases can lead to the development of resistance to the antimicrobics and resistance can either diminish effectiveness or render an antimicrobic ineffective as a therapeutic. Although use may result in a population of bacteria that are resistant, the exact fate of this population in terms of persistence and transmission has been difficult to determine. In this report, we describe the antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella isolates collected from pigs on farm and subsequently at slaughter.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014