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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genetic Analyses of Two Independent Chlorophyll-Deficient Mutants Identified among the Progeny of a Single Chimeric Foliage Soybean Plant

Authors
item Palmer, Reid
item Burzlaff, Jay - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Shoemaker, Randy

Submitted to: Journal of Heredity
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 28, 2000
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: In many plants, multicolor leaves such as green, white, yellow occur. Sometimes these color patterns indicate disease, other times these multicolor leaves make mineral nutrition imbalances. We have identified soybean plants that produce large numbers of multicolored leaf plants. Among the offspring of such plants, completely yellow plants may occur. Such plants may live and reproduce similar plants or plants may be lethal. We have genetically analyzed viable yellow and lethal plants that are the offspring of a single multicolor leaf soybean plant. These two yellow plants came from one mutable leaf (chimera) plant. Yet,the genetics indicate that these two yellow plants belong to different genetic systems. This suggests that a common origin (progenitor) existed which has not yet been identified. The two yellow plants are of interest to plant molecular biologists and to plant physiologists as an explanation of this phenomenon awaits molecular experimentation.

Technical Abstract: Chimeric (variegated) foliage plants are frequently observed in many species. In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], progeny of chimeric plants are a source of nuclear- and cytoplasmically- inherited mutants. Self- pollinated progeny of a single chimeric plant derived from tissue culture of PI 427099 (Jilin 3) gave plants with green foliage, chimeric foliage, yellow foliage (viable), and yellow foliage (lethal). Our objectives were to determine: 1) inheritance, linkage, and allelism of the lethal yellow mutant with known chlorophyll-deficient mutants; 2) inheritance, linkage, and allelism of the viable yellow mutant with known chlorophyll-deficient mutants; 3) allelism of the lethal yellow mutant with the viable yellow mutant; and 4) male and female gamete transmission of the viable yellow mutant trait. The viable yellow mutant was allelic to T323, y20 y20 (Ames 2) Mdh1-n Mdh1-n (Ames 2) and was assigned Genetic Type Collection number T361 and gene symbol y20 y20 (Ames 24) Mdh1-n Mdh1-n (Ames 22). The letha yellow mutant was allelic to T225H (Y18 y18) and was assigned Genetic Type Collection number T362H and gene symbol Y18 y18 (Ames 2). T225H became Y18 y18 (Ames 1). The two chlorophyll-deficient mutants were not linked to each other. There was no significant difference in F1 male or female gamete transmission of the viable yellow mutant. However, many cross-combinations gave significant deviations from the expected 3 green plants: 1 viable yellow plant in the F2 generation. The allelism of these two chlorophyll- deficient mutants with mutants (T225H and T323) derived from putative transposable element systems is intriguing. An explanation of this phenomenon awaits molecular experimentation.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014