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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evolution of Fruit Fly Oviposition Behavior

Authors
item Diaz-Fleischer, Francisco - TAPACHULA, CHIAPAS, MX
item Papaj, Daniel - UNIV. OF AZ., TUCSON
item Prokopy, Ronald - UNIV. OF MASS., AMHERST
item Norrbom, Allen
item Aluja, Martin - XALAPA, VERACRUZ, MEXICO

Submitted to: CRC Press
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: July 30, 1999
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The Tephritidae (true fruit flies) is one of the most agriculturally important families of flies. It includes numerous pests, such as the Mediterranean fruit fly and the apple maggot. Study of the behavior of these flies is important for their regulation and control. For example, one of the safest and most successful control methods is the sterile male technique, in which irradiated, sterile male flies are reared and released in huge numbers to mate with wild females. To mass rear them and measure the success of the technique, detailed knowledge of each species' mating and oviposition is required. The purpose of this chapter, to be included in a book on fruit fly behavior and evolutionary relationships, is to analyze what is known about fruit fly oviposition behavior from an evolutionary perspective, to point out trends and key innovations, and identify possible future research areas. Such information is valuable to ARS and other scientists studying the behavior, biology and control of fruit flies.

Technical Abstract: The Tephritidae (true fruit flies) is one of the most agriculturally important families of flies. It includes numerous pests, such as the Mediterranean fruit fly and the apple maggot. Study of the behavior of these flies is important for their regulation and control. For example, one of the safest and most successful control methods is the sterile male technique, in which irradiated, sterile male flies are reared and released in huge numbers to mate with wild females. To mass rear them and measure the success of the technique, detailed knowledge of each species' mating and oviposition behavior is required. The purpose of this chapter, to be included in a book on fruit fly behavior and evolutionary relationships, is to analyze what is known about fruit fly oviposition behavior from an evolutionary perspective, to point out trends and key innovations, and identify possible future research areas.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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