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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Biomarkers As Predictors in Health and Ecological Risk Assessment

Authors
item Chambers, Janice, - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV
item Boone,, Scott - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV
item Carr, Russell - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV
item Chambers, Howard - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV
item Straus, David

Submitted to: Human and Ecological Risk Assessment
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 1, 2002
Publication Date: January 1, 2002
Citation: CHAMBERS, J.E., BOONE,, S.J., CARR, R.L., CHAMBERS, H.W., STRAUS, D.L. BIOMARKERS AS PREDICTORS IN HEALTH AND ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT. HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT. 2002. v.8(1). p.165-176.

Interpretive Summary: Biomarkers are measurable biological indicators of chemical exposure and other stressors. Biomarkers can have great utility in the risk assessment process by providing an indication of the degree of exposure of humans or animals in natural populations to a specific chemical or class of chemicals. Adequate information is rarely available on the appropriate aspects of the exposure to have well described biomarkers of effect which can be widely applicable to additional populations. Specific examples of acetylcholinesterase inhibition following exposure to organophosphorus insecticides are cited from experiments in both mammals rats and fish. These experiments have indicated that the degree of inhibition can be readily influenced internal and external factors and that the degree of inhibition is not readily correlated with toxicological effects. Care must be taken when attempting to utilize biomarkers in the risk assessment process until more complete documentation is available on various aspects of the exposure.

Technical Abstract: Biomarkers are measurable biological parameters which change in response to xenobiotic exposure and other environmental or physiological stressors, and can be indices of toxicant exposure or effects. If the biomarkers are sufficiently specific and well characterized, they can have great utility in the risk assessment process by providing an indication of the degree of exposure of humans or animals in natural populations to a specific xenobiotic or class of xenobiotics. Most biomarkers are effective as indices of exposure, but adequate information is rarely available on the appropriate dose-response curves to have well described biomarkers of effect which can be widely applicable to additional populations. Specific examples of acetylcholinesterase inhibition following exposure to organophosphorus insecticides are cited from experiments in both mammals (rats) and fish. These experiments have indicated that the degree of inhibition can be readily influenced by endogenous (eg age) and exogenous (eg chemical exposures) factors, and that the degree of

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