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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Survival and Development of Tobacco Aphids on Tobacco Plants Grown under Elevated Levels of Ozone

Authors
item Jackson, David
item Eckel, Rv - RVWE CONSULTING
item Rufty, T. - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV
item Heagle, Allen

Submitted to: Tobacco Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 16, 1999
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Tropospheric ozone is a major air pollutant that directly affects many crop plants, including flue-cured tobacco. Ozone also may positively or negatively affect insect herbivores feeding on ozone-injured plants. The purpose of this study was to determine how the survival, development, and reproduction of the tobacco aphid were affected by feeding on tobacco plants grown under a range of ozone concentrations and ultraviolet-B radiation levels in open-top field chambers at the USDA-ARS, Air Quality Research Unit at North Carolina State University, Raleigh. Ozone concentrations were established by charcoal filtration, which reduced ozone to approximately half ambient, or by addition of ozone to unfiltered air. Survival, development, and reproduction of tobacco aphids were reduced when these insects were forced to live on plants in ozone-enhanced treatments. There appeared to be no direct effects of ozone on tobacco aphids. These experiments contribute to our understanding of the ecological consequences of increased environmental pollutants, such as tropospheric ozone, on tobacco production systems. Although increased tropospheric ozone may have direct detrimental effects on tobacco production, it is unlikely to lead to additional problems with tobacco aphids.

Technical Abstract: Tobacco plants, Nicotiana tabacum L., were grown under conditions of elevated levels of ozone in open-top chambers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Air Quality Research Unit at Raleigh, N. C., during 1991 and 1992. Survival, development, and reproduction of tobacco aphids, Myzus nicotianae Blackman, were reduced when these insects were forced to live on plants in ozone-enhanced treatments. These experiments contribute to our understanding of the ecological consequences of increased environmental pollutants, such as tropospheric ozone, on tobacco production systems.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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