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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Influence of the Level and Location of Contamination on the Multiplication of Salmonella Enteritidis at Different Storage Temperatures in Experimentally Inoculated Eggs

Authors
item Gast, Richard
item Holt, Peter

Submitted to: Poultry Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 8, 1999
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Rapid refrigeration of eggs to temperatures able to restrict bacterial growth has been widely recommended as a strategy to reduce opportunities for contaminated eggs to serve as a source of transmission of Salmonella enteritidis (SE) to humans. The present study used experimentally contaminated preparations of liquid egg components to determine whether small numbers of SE cells could multiply to higher and more dangerous levels during 3 days of incubation at different temperatures. This model was designed to simulate the potential opportunities for SE multiplication after eggs are laid and before refrigeration lowers internal egg temperatures to levels able to restrict further bacterial growth. Rapid and extensive SE multiplication often occurred at temperatures of 17.5 C or higher, especially when the bacteria had an opportunity for access to yolk nutrients and when contaminated eggs were incubated for 2 or 3 days before sampling.

Technical Abstract: Prompt refrigeration to temperatures capable of restricting microbial growth has been recommended as an approach to reducing the likelihood that contaminated eggs will transmit Salmonella enteritidis (SE)to humans. Using experimentally contaminated egg components, the present study determined the extent to which small numbers of SE could grow to more dangerous levels sat different temperatures over a period of up to 3 days. This model was intended to simulate the potential opportunities for SE multiplication following oviposition and prior to the achievement of internal temperatures able to prevent further microbial growth in eggs. At relatively warmer temperatures (25 C) and higher inoculum doses (150 cells), rapid and substantial SE multiplication often occurred, especially when the bacteria had an opportunity for access to yolk nutrients and when contaminated eggs were incubated for 2 or 3 days before sampling. Extensive multiplication of fSE was less frequently observed at lower inoculum doses (15 cells), shorte storage times (1 day), lower temperatures (10-17.5 C), and when contaminants were introduced into the albumen

Last Modified: 11/24/2014
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